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Posts Tagged ‘Leeuwenhoek’

This post was published on 18 September 2019, but I subsequently received information so that I can update this post. I will bold my additions. My amazing blogger buddy, José at Enhanced News Archive went all the way to the Kalamazoo Public Library to find the answer to the question I posed in my original post: is there an announcement in the newspaper about the wedding of Alice and Clarence. I wanted to see where they were married and thought the info might have been published. I searched in Genealogy Bank for the article in the Kalamazoo Gazette, but I could find nothing. If you read the original post, skip to the next bolded passage.

On 12 September 1923, Grandpa’s cousin Alice Leeuwenhoek married Clarence Dewey Moerdyk in Kalamazoo. They are the last couple listed on the following (cropped) image.

Clarence was 25 and Alice 26. He held a job as a foreman, and she had no employment. I found that interesting since the family thinks of her as an accomplished seamstress. In fact, I discovered a jottings ad from 14 May 1922 about Alice’s trade. She advertises her hemstitching and picoting, which is an embroidery loop edging used as ornamentation.

Right under Alice’s ad is one for the family’s Ramona Park dancing.

Their fathers are listed: Peter Moerdyk and Lambertus (Uncle Lou) Leeuwenhoek.

Their mothers were Cora Stevens and Jennie (Aunt Jen) DeKorn.

The couple was married by Benjamin Laman, Minister of the Gospel. Mr. Laman had become the 4th pastor of Bethany Reformed Church on 7 June 1923, just three months before Alice’s wedding. I tried to find a society page mention to discover if they were married in someone’s home, but neglected to find anything. In the search, I found articles about both their parents’ weddings though!

José found the article the old-fashioned way! By searching the microfiche of the newspaper at the Kalamazoo Public Library! So much for the accuracy of the cataloging skills at Genealogy Bank. It’s a reminder that there is NOTHING like primary sources in genealogy or family research. I will post the article itself and at the end of this post I will post the full front page of the newspaper from that date: 12 September 1923.

Look at this great info. First of all, now I know where Alice and Clarence were married: in Reverend Laman’s (sic in the article) home. I have to wonder if this was a parsonage owned by the church. Then we can see that they honeymooned in Chicago and were going to live temporarily with her parents, Lou and Jennie Leeuwenhoek, at 110 Balch Street. So they didn’t have a lot of extra cash would be my guess. Another great piece of information is that Alice’s dress was tan. I can see that the dress below definitely could be tan, but I’m not sure that it is crepe de chine. Is it?

I wrote about the church here: Bethany Reformed Church, circa 1918

and about Alice’s marriage here: Aunt Jen and Uncle Lou’s SIL Clarence Moerdyk

When I wrote these posts I did not know that I had in my possession the wedding portrait of Alice and Clarence. In my opinion, it’s a stunning photograph, mainly because of Alice’s sense of style and model’s grace.

I really love Alice’s hat!!!

The portrait is in a cardboard folder.

I hate to take it out of the folder, but I would bet that the cardboard is not acid-free. I think I will keep the parts separate, in 2 different acid-free sleeves, and then tape them together.

I’m sure Alice would love that we admired her dress and hat all these years later.

Here is the full front page of the Kalamazoo Gazette from 12 September 1923:

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Last Wednesday’s post shared some WWI crowd photos from an album of photos from 1917, put together by Alice Leeuwenhoek, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

You can read it here: WWI in Kalamazoo, Part I This post will make the most sense if you look at the photos first.

Here is a sample photo from the post:

It’s my favorite because of the man with his arm around someone’s shoulders.

I knew the photos were from 1917 and taken in downtown Kalamazoo, but I could only guess that the citizens were seeing off the troops. Then I started searching for newspaper articles. They create a bit of a story about the event.

In the first article, dated 14 September 1917, we learn:

The “folks back home” in Kalamazoo will be given a two-hour opportunity sometime Sunday for a final farewell to the boys of Companies C and D. / / There is going to be a big military formality about the farewell.

The article states that Kalamazoo will have a two hour layover for the troops who are embarked on a long journey. They will make up the equivalent of a mile long train. These men will be from 4 companies–two of them Kalamazoo companies. The whole shindig, including a parade, has been planned by Col. Joseph Westnedge. The long artery down Kalamazoo and Portage was named Westnedge in his honor.

15 September 1917:


The next day we learn that everything is ready for the men to arrive. Now they are calling it the 32nd Michigan Infantry, made up of 2,000 men and officers. The event is scheduled for 16 September 1917, the next day, which is a Sunday.

Then this on page 1 of 16 September 1917 Kalamazoo Gazette:

There is a delay because they didn’t have enough cars to get the troops there by the schedule time:

There is deep disappointment among the relatives and friends of the Kalamazoo units because of the fact that the Thirty-second will not arrive in this city this morning. MEN GREATLY DISAPPOINTED.

Still, the event as planned is described in some detail, ending with the information that the big whistles at the municipal pumping station will be sounded an hour before the arrival of the train carrying the troops.

The next article is from Monday, September 17, the day the scheduled visit eventually occurred, but written ahead of time.

People from SW Michigan have been pouring into Kalamazoo from Friday night through Sunday night, just to get a glimpse of their (dough)boys before they take off for the unknown.

I CANNOT FIND AN ARTICLE WRITTEN AFTER THE EVENT ABOUT HOW IT ALL WENT DOWN. That is a little strange. Maybe they didn’t want to write how botched it was–or wasn’t.

Of course, that wasn’t it. Three days later the Kalamazoo Gazette reported that 96 more Kalamazoo men took their places at Fort Custer for training.

All for the insatiable appetite of a horrific international war. No wonder the townspeople turned out in such numbers to honor the young soldiers.

Last week blogger Louise Mabey caused me to question how many of these boys returned home. I used this website  and counted at least 27 Kalamazoo men who died in battle. Many others died from disease, including their leader Col. Westnedge. I found two boys of the same last name who are related to a friend. Another Kalamazoo street shares their last name, Milham. Also, that 27 does not include those from tiny towns right around Kalamazoo or from Battle Creek. So sad to think of those people in the streets in the photos grieving not long after this.

***

In thinking about the possibility of Joseph DeKorn taking these photos, I wondered what a 36 year old man was doing during WWI. Would he have been required to serve? I have a temporary membership to Fold3, and it was there that I discovered his WWI draft registration on 12 September 1918. He was a civil engineer in Ohio. I am not sure if he was in Ohio the year before, the month that these photographs were taken or not. So it is possible that someone other than Uncle Joe took the photos. Here is his draft registration.

He was lucky that the war ended two months later.

After this was posted, Amy at BrotmanBlog found some more articles!

 

 

Kalamazoo_Gazette_1917-09-19_1 This is a wide article. I hope the link works.

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In an album of photos from 1917, put together by Alice Leeuwenhoek, are crowd photos that somehow involve WWI.

The following is a sample of what the album looks like when you open it up. Most of the photos are of Alice and her family, like these first ones.

The war photos were taken in Kalamazoo. You can see the Humphrey Company building in a couple of them. According to the 1905 and 1926 Kalamazoo City Directories, Humphrey Company, a gas company, was located at 501-515 N. Rose Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan. Like a lot of businesses at that time period, it was located on the “north side,” which became an almost exclusively African-American area by the time I was a kid.

 

 

Downtown Kalamazoo is not that big, and only a few streets over is the main street, West Michigan Avenue.

So tell me: what do you think is going on in these photos? I think it’s exciting to see the density  of the crowd. There are soldiers leaning out of the windows. Are they being seen off to war by the people of Kalamazoo?

The details of hats and the white/black contrast of female/male attire is fascinating.

Notice in the above photo two people standing on an elevated surface. The man on our left has his arm around the other person’s shoulders.  I imagine they are saying goodbye to a loved one.

These are photos with the Humphrey Company in the background.

 

As to the photographer of these photos, I suspect they were taken by Joseph DeKorn, Alice’s uncle, because she is the subject of so many of her photos. Also, Joseph was the family photographer of the time period. The question is, if Alice was not a photographer herself, why did she own so many albums?

I don’t know the answer to that question.

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I have a lot of photographs of Alice Leeuwenhoek. She was an only child, and I suspect she might have been doted upon. And maybe she was a favorite subject of her uncle, Joseph DeKorn, the family photographer. Alice was born in 1897, and Joseph was born in 1881. He was doing a lot of photography when she was growing up, and she lived next door.

Here are a couple of photos that are marked with Alice’s name on the back.

Alice looks so cute here. She’s wearing a hat that looks to me like an Easter bonnet, especially on a child so small. Her coat with the cute flaps reminds me of a dress coat I bought for my daughter when she was little. She had been wearing hand-me-down dresses for dressup, and I wanted her to have one nice outfit, so I bought her a red dress with matching red coat.  The coat had a little cape very similar to Alice’s coat. Eighty-some years later.

Here is one from 1914. It doesn’t look to me a lot like Alice, but it is a tall lady with dark hair standing by the side of Richard DeKorn’s house. Richard was Alice’s grandfather, as well as Grandpa’s grandfather. And the photo is labeled Alice!

Now is when I need a horse expert. If Derrick stops by, I know he’ll know. Is this a pony? The reason I think so is that the proportions seem mature.

I would know Richard’s house anywhere because of the light stripe through the dark brick. Very distinctive.

 

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These two old photographs are in poor condition and not labelled. I don’t know who the boys are. The girl could be Alice Leewenhoek, born 1897.

It is likely that the photographs were taken in the Burdick-Balch neighborhood in Kalamazoo.

These boys do not look too happy to be at work. Although the pitchfork made me think gardening, there seems to be a building material stacked behind them. What do you think is going on?

Any insights would be greatly appreciated!

Make it a good week!

UPDATE: Jose challenged me to check out the book the little girl is holding. It looks like Cinderella illustrations to me. Cinderella or Ashenputtel or Cendrillon on our left and the stepsisters on the right. See what you think. I made a Pinterest board with illustrations of Cinderella with her broom: Cinderella with Broom

 

 

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While I haven’t done much genealogy research lately, I have scanned some antique photos. I am eager to get back to the research, but haven’t yet had the time. In the meantime, here is one of the “new” photos I’ve scanned.I love this photo for its moody quality with the reflection of the trees on the house and in the windows, how the closeup of the house almost looks gothic, and his little lace-up boots.

So who are these people and when was it taken? Did they just step outside for the photo? I don’t see warm coats or hats.

This is what the back of the photo says:

Alice Leeuwenhoek and her little cousin, my grandfather, Adrian Zuidweg.

Was somebody using this photo as scrap paper to do a little sum? 232 + 94 = 326

So 1914 or 1916? Grandpa was born 31 October 1908. Do you think this photo is 1914, 1915, or 1916?

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Those of you who have been reading The Family Kalamazoo for a time know that I published a chapbook this past year based on my research findings, my imagination, and some historical knowledge. Kin Types is a collection of lyric poems, prose poems, and flash nonfiction.

On Monday I woke up to discover that Kin Types was a finalist for the prestigious Eric Hoffer Award. It’s in stellar company.. This recognition validates the work I did on the book and on this blog. Best of all, the book gets a gold foil sticker for the cover ;).

It will kind of look like this when the sticker is put on the book (only not such a large sticker).

If you click through the link to the Amazon page, the book can be ordered for a real deal right now; check it out. To order through Barnes & Noble, try this link.

 

 

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