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Posts Tagged ‘Adrian Zuidweg’

Almost two years ago, I posted photos of my grandfather as a very young man with an unidentified female. I hypothesized that she was his girlfriend before my grandmother.

Here they are together–looks like a couple to me.

I was going through some papers and found memory books my grandparents had prepared (one of his memories and one of hers) for the grandchildren. Inside Grandpa’s memory book, the question is asked: WHO IS THE GIRL YOU REMEMBER THE MOST?

This was his answer: (2) Vander Weele and Garthe: Don’t remember first names

So I did a little research on these names. I figured out who I believe at least one of the girls is, based on the census reports and other documents.

Garthe turned out to be Margaret Christine Garthe, born 11 days after my grandfather in 1908. She wasn’t from Kalamazoo, but from northern Michigan. She had come to Kalamazoo to attend Western. I found her in the 1928 Western State Teacher’s College yearbook.

Tell me if this isn’t the girl my grandfather is seen with above. Back row, 3rd from left.

 

From Ancestry it looks as if Margaret married Hans James Knutson. She passed away in 1997 in Muskegon, Michigan. Grandpa lived until 2000, happily married to the end to Grandma.

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As usual, the more I’ve learned, the more questions I have! Realizing that all the newspaper articles have not been properly entered into the Genealogy Bank database, I know I am probably missing more articles about Frank. Although it’s easy to always assume this with data entry of genealogical information, I can tell from the Gazette’s own files that this is true. There is an article where they repeat choice nuggets from the Gazette from 10-20 years previously and Frank shows up there, but the original article does not show up.

What seems to be great omissions are obituaries for both Frank and Genevieve (Remine) Tazelaar. Since Frank was so involved in the community, as the sheer number of articles attests, why wouldn’t there be an obituary for his wife in 1930 and for himself in 1950?

I don’t even have a death certificate for Frank and when I tried to order one, a website tried to steal take $60 from me!

Let’s see what I discovered through what I did find, though.

  • Frank was extremely involved in the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. He may have had a connection to the Masons.
  • He was not only involved in these organizations, but was frequently elected to the boards and organized dances and other activities. In 1916, Frank was made Master of Exchequer of the Pythias lodge. As chairman of the Pythias festivities for New Year’s Eve 1915/1916, Frank commissioned a streetcar to remain for the party stragglers so they would have a way to get home. For a party in 1916, Frank even made sure the ladies were presented with a “delicate” box of chocolates.
  • Frank was a sportsman who raced his mare Gas Light in the 1905-1906 period, which would have been just before his marriage. There was talk about the possibility of Gaslight being entered into the bigger races in Detroit and Chicago. Now I understand why the photograph of Frank with the horse and dog is marked “GASLIGHT.” That was the same horse!
  • Frank hunted for small game and birds.
  • Frank was a men’s clothing salesman of some repute.
  • Before his marriage, when Frank went on vacation, the Kalamazoo Gazette noted it.
  • When Frank changed places of employment, he was mentioned in the paper. In August 5, 1894, he worked for That Thomas clothing house. In 1896 (March 19)  he went to work at the brand new and elegant clothing house of Mr. Yesner as one of his three salesmen. In 1907, Frank went to work for Hershfield’s. See article below.
  • In March 1906, Frank bought a lot on Ranney Street from Mrs. Blanche Henderson and “is having a fine residence erected on it.” That house would be ready for his bride Genevieve less than 4 months later. Ranney is a small street off South Westnedge Ave.
  • On April 30, 1911, Frank was building an “elegant new home” at 122 North West Street (West Street later became Westnedge Avenue, according to Sharon Ferraro). The property is “for sale,” but of course when Frank had influenza in 1918, that is the house he and Genevieve lived at.
  • His “wife” is only mentioned once in the newspaper, related to the transfer of a piece of real estate to someone else for $1.

I also discovered another photograph of Frank. Are these riding goggles he is wearing?

Here are a sampling of newspaper articles with a couple of surprises.What does this theatre ad mean? Was Frank an actor? How could the entire cast be as presented at the Chicago Auditorium (read this link about this marvelous performance venue!), which was a 4,000 seat theatre?

I have to say that if Frank was an actor it would not surprise me at all. He had to have been a larger-than-life man, full of humor (2 or 3 times he’s quoted in a humor column), and loving a good time. He was quite young at the time this ad was placed. The date of 10 November 1901 is five years before his marriage. He was about 25.

A curious item was in the Society and Personal column two months after Frank’s marriage to Genevieve:

Was Frank the only non-Jew in this party to attend synagogue services? And who was Mose Dunstin and how did Frank know him? All I have learned so far (of value to me for my curiosity) about Mose was that he was Moses Dunstin, born in “Russian Poland,” and his father’s surname was Danskin. He died 4 April 1910 in Kalamazoo at the age of 52. Cause of death was Angina Pectoris (chest pain) and contributing factors were influenza and albuminaria. Notice that for Moses I was able to get a free death certificate. So unfair . . . . Anyway, when Moses invited Frank to attend services, Moses was only 48.

Because the date of the article was 21 September 1906 I wondered if the event involved the High Holidays, but it seems that Sukkot began on September 21 (probably evening of September 20), so maybe it had to do with that holiday instead.

In 1907, Frank went to yet another clothier:

Notice it says Frank was with “That Thompson Clothing House” for 9 years. If he went with Yesner in 1896, that would mean he had been had the previous one since 1887. Since he was born in 1876, that would be impossible. What makes sense to me is that he left That Thomas for Yesner, left Yesner, and went back to That Thomas. Or the paper has the nine years wrong, which is also very possible. Note: I don’t yet know what year the Tazelaars immigrated to the U.S.

On January 29, 1914, the 80th birthday of Frank’s mother, Adriana Bek Tazelaar, was noticed. I prefer to post the whole Society column for this one. The mention is on the right side, the sixth paragraph down. In this paragraph there are mention of Adriana’s descendants, which is useful for locating Frank within his own family tree.

Later that year, on June 25, there is a somewhat humorous article about the fishing teams of the Knights of Pythias lodge. Frank is one of the team captains.  This article is notable for sharing Frank’s photo. He was about 39 here . . . .

This article is ALSO notable for mentioning my great-grandfather’s fish market! Referring to the fish caught in the contest, the article says, “All fish must be delivered at Zuideweg’s [SIC: should be Zuidweg’s] market in Eleanor Street by Monday noon . . . .” So you know the connection, Genevieve Remine Tazelaar was the first cousin of my great-great-grandfather Richard DeKorn whose son-in-law was my great-grandfather Adrian Zuidweg who owned the fish market. Now the most important part: Richard DeKorn built the Pythian building known as Pythian Castle and, earlier, as the Telegraph Building. The link explains about the building.

I’ve posted a photo of the fish market in the past.

Fish Market on Eleanor Street with Adrian Zuidweg and helper

Seven years later, there is a notice that Frank needs to have a frame house moved from a lot.

April 3, 1921
Kalamazoo Gazette

When Genevieve died in September 1930, the couple were living at 423 S. Westnedge Avenue, so it stands to reason that Frank wanted to sell a frame house on new property so he could build a new house. It would be at least the third house he built for himself and his wife. Her parents probably lived there with them, as well. It might sound funny to move a house, but when I was little I watched a house being moved down the street while I was holding my grandmother’s hand. I never forgot that first image of a house on wheels, although I did see a similar scene much later in life.

The last article of any note I could find was on 29 September 1922.

From being the toast of the town to an arrest! For shooting ducks after sunrise yet, which is very unsportsmanlike. Maybe it was his companions who steered him wrong ;). At least he didn’t catch undersized bass like Mr. Denner!

All kidding aside, while I loved getting to know Frank, I am really ticked off that Genevieve’s life is completely erased, as if she never existed. This could be because it is so difficult to research the lives of women and also because Frank was so outgoing. I hope that she had a pleasant life.

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In “honor” of the weather some of the United States has been having this week, I am posting photographs from the Burdick and Balch neighborhood in Kalamazoo during the blizzard of 1978.The yellow house was my grandparents’ house at the corner of Burdick and Emerson.The white building was my grandfather’s Sunoco station.The other houses are from the neighborhood. As befitting a 1970s camera and film, the color is poor–yellowy and faded.

I’ve posted the house and gas station in the past. Here is the house from 1947:

Grandma and Grandpa’s house on Burdick Street

You can find the station at Down at the Station.

Meanwhile, Phoenix was about 90 degrees yesterday :).

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I remember my grandfather wearing his Sunoco “uniform” and his Sunday sportcoat, but I never thought of him as at the height of fashion. At least not in his attire.

But take a look at him as a 22 year old in 1930!

At first I saw his sport coat, sweater, shirt, fancy belt, and plaid pants as a spiffy outfit, but didn’t stop to think: why is he wearing bloomers? haha

Well, he’s wearing knickers (no, I don’t mean those kind of knickers), which are short for knickerbockers. Copied from this website:

Knickerbockers, later shortened to knickers, were popular sports wear for wealthy gentleman. Knickers were baggy pants that fit low on the natural waist and tight below the knee, ballooning out around the thighs. For upper class gentlemen wearing white or light striped knickers in summer with a matching Norfolk jacket was the look of the teens and early 1920’s.

Grandpa is not wearing a Norfolk jacket, but one that does look a little preppy over that sweater and shirt collar.

 

Plaid Plus Fours

Variations of knickers included plus-fours, plus- sixes, plus-eights and plus-tens. The plus is how many inches below the knee they hung. Plus fours came in tweeds, linen, corduroy, and flannel. Many were solid colors but to be really trendy men wore stripes, checks, and plaid patterns.  They were already on trend when the prince of wales went on tour in American wearing plus fours. His approval meant any man NOT wearing plus fours was out of  fashion.

Notice that “to be really trendy men wore stripes, checks, and plaid patterns.” That’s Grandpa–“really trendy”!

Knickers were worn for more than just sports and casual entertainment. They were common among both fashion forward industries such as the movies, but also among working classes who found the sturdier material knickers quite useful on the farm, for making deliveries, and for some factory work. The short legs and light weight clothes made them cool to wear in summer.

Not sure what beach this photo was taken at, but his outfit is sporty for the time period, as befitting a walk on the beach. By today’s standards, he’s a little over-dressed!

 

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My grandfather, Adrian Zuidweg, had an album of photos which included those from a parade in 1931. It seems most likely that the parade took place in Kalamazoo, Michigan–probably down Burdick Street. But I need help identifying the buildings to know for sure. Many of the business names that are readable seem pretty “generic.” These names include Montgomery Ward, Ross Carrier, Kroger Stores, and Grand Hotel.

I know the date because of this float, but I don’t understand the significance of the “centennial” aspect of the design.

The Light float is the last photograph in the album. Here are the others in order of placement. If you can find any signs that this is Kalamazoo–or elsewhere–please let me know.

 

It seems odd that there aren’t any clues in these photos that indicate the “local” setting of the parade. There are quite a few ladies of the court. Kalamazoo is home to Western Michigan University and Kalamazoo College, but I don’t see any references to the schools, so maybe a check of 1930-31 and a 1931-32 yearbooks would rule out the colleges as participants in the parade.

A clue that I can’t interpret: Benton Harbor Exchange. This does seem to indicate that the parade was in Michigan, but was it in Benton Harbor or St. Joseph or Kalamazoo? And what exactly was the Benton Harbor Exchange?

Another possible clue: see that tall building in the background of the “downtown” photos? If that building can be identified it might help to lock in the city.

Just before the parade photos is one photo of Grandpa with Grandma when they were boyfriend and girlfriend–before they got married in 1932. Sorry about the watermark in the wrong place. I added watermarks en masse for these photos.

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Two and a half years ago (how can it be that long ago?!) I posted a series of 12 “episodes” called “My Grandfather’s Story,” which was the results of an interview of Grandpa conducted by a social worker when my grandparents were living in a senior apartment complex. If you want to check the story out, just type My Grandfather’s Story into the search bar of this blog and you will be taken to links to all the posts.

But my own family interviewed Grandpa (and Grandma, too) about life in “the old days,” as well!

I thought I would share a very brief clip where Grandpa is being interviewed about where he was born, and a bit about the neighborhood he was family was living in. It relates to a post where I wondered about a house the Leeuwenhoeks may have lived in. This would have been Grandpa’s Aunt Jen and Uncle Lou and their daughter Alice. You can find it here: Did the Leeuwenhoeks Live Here? After getting information from a reader, I posted Library Research on That Little House in the Woods.

Now we hear in Grandpa’s own words what he has to say about the neighborhood. When my mother asks about “the brick house,” she means Richard DeKorn’s (Grandpa’s grandfather) house. See it and read about it here: The Richard DeKorn House. My aunt Alice is seated on our left, and she begins the questions. Uncle Don is in the middle, and that is Mom on his other side.

One of the interesting points Grandpa mentions is that his grandfather, Richard DeKorn, owned three houses in the first block of Balch. By first block, I believe he means from the corner of Balch and Burdick. One would be the “brick house” he built himself. One of the others might be the Leeuwenhoek house.

Grandpa liked to tell stories about the past, so I think he would have liked these blog posts.

 

Grandpa and his father

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After my last post was published, Elly and I conferred again about our Mulder family. We discovered that of the six children of Adriaan and Johanna (Mulder) Zuijdweg, we had two differences. First of all, Elly didn’t have a record of the first child, Kornelis, born in 1837. And I did not have another child who died at a very young age. Although I had on my tree, Johanna, born 1847, I did not know that there was an earlier Johanna, born in 1845, who died on 5 March, 1847. She passed away two months before her Grandfather Mulder died, and less than two years after her father applied for emigration.

Now we know why the newspaper account said there were 5 children and not 6–or 4. At the time of the application for emigration there were five Zuijdweg children. But afterwards, one died and two more were born.

So it seems likely that there really were seven in total, with one dying as a baby.

But that ain’t all, folks. There are two other exciting discoveries made by Elly.

First, she found an advertisement for Johanna Mulder Zuijdweg’s 70th birthday! Johanna’s family must have been proud of her living to that age. Elly says it is customary in the Netherlands, even today for some people, to advertise 50th, 60th, 70th, etc. birthdays. It might mean that her family and friends had a small party for Johanna’s birthday.

Look at that ad. Very very interesting. It says ZUIDWEG. Not Zuijdweg. What is up with that? I thought the boundary between the two spellings was the Atlantic Ocean. But now I see this spelling used in the Netherlands! ***

Second, Elly noticed a “coincidence” when we saw the name Hogesteger in more than one place and she checked it out. I noticed it and just assumed (you know what they say about that word, right?) that it was a coincidence. But it’s no coincidence.

Adriaan Zuijdweg and his wife, Johanna Mulder Zuijdweg, wanted to emigrate to the United States in 1845. He might have been part of the group seceding from the Reformed Church. His wife’s brother, Johannes Mulder was married to Henderika Johanna Hogesteger. Johannes and Henderika emigrated to Holland, Michigan, in 1857 with their three children. But ten years before that, Henderika’s brother Johannes Hogesteger emigrated in 1847 for religious reasons. He actually was one of the leaders of the movement that seceded from the Reformed Church.

In fact, you can read here in Michigan History about how Johannes Hogesteger, a Mulder in-law, figured into the history of Michigan.

The city of Zeeland has a rich history of Christianity, beginning with the first settlers who emigrated from the Netherlands due to persecution from the State Church.

The First Reformed Church of Zeeland was formed before the city of Zeeland was founded; it was organized in the Netherlands before the 457 immigrants sailed to the United States. It is thought that this was the only other group of people besides the Pilgrims that immigrated to the U.S. as an organized church.

Reverend Cornelius Vander Meulen

Reverend Cornelius Vander Meulen

The first church service as a congregation was held three months after the arrival of the settlers, in the home of Jan Steketee. Many Sundays found the settlers worshipping outside, though in inclement weather they held services in one of the larger homes in the village. Rev. Vander Meulen was asked to be the pastor. Jannes Van de Luyster, who played an influential role in facilitating the immigration movement, was elected as elder, along with Johannes Hogesteger. Jan Steketee and Adrian Glerum were elected deacons.

In May 1848 the first church building was dedicated, but by the end of the year so many immigrants had arrived that it was necessary to build a new church. In 1849, the church recorded 175 families in the congregation.

 

 

What I get out of this is that my relatives were involved in the only other group besides the Pilgrims that moved an entire church to the United States. It seems that the Mulders (Johannes and Henderika) came ten years later than Henderika’s brother, but their 14-year-old son Karel arrived earlier. And Adriaan and Johanna never did make it to Michigan to join their fellow worshipers.

***

Info on Johanna from Zeeuw Archief

Birtday registers Zeewuws Archief

 

25.GOE-G-1845 Goes geboorteakten burgerlijke stand

Geboorteakte Johanna Maria Zuidweg, 10-05-1845
Soort akte:
Geboorteakte
Aktedatum:
10-05-1845
Aktenummer:
89
Geboortedatum:
10-05-1845
Geboorteplaats:
Goes
Kind:
Johanna Maria Zuidweg

Geslacht: Vrouwelijk
Vader:
Adriaan Zuidweg
Moeder:
Johanna Mulder
Gemeente:
Goes
Toegangsnummer:
25 Burgerlijke Stand Zeeland (1796) 1811-1980, (1796) 1811-1980
Inventarisnummer:
GOE-G-1845
Owner:
Zeeuws Archief

 

 

Death registers Zeeuws Archief

 

25.GOE-O-1847 Goes overlijdensakten burgerlijke stand
Overlijden Johanna Maria Zuidweg, 5-3-1847
Soort akte:
Overlijdensakte
Aktenummer:
74
Aktedatum:
1847
Gemeente:
Goes
Overlijdensdatum:
5-3-1847
Overlijdensplaats:
Goes
Overledene:
Johanna Maria Zuidweg

Geboorteplaats: Goes
Geslacht: Vrouwelijk
Leeftijd: 2 jaar
Vader:
Adriaan Zuidweg

Leeftijd: 42
Beroep: Kleermaker
Moeder:
Johanna Mulder

Leeftijd: 39
Beroep: Zonder
Toegangsnummer:
25 Burgerlijke Stand Zeeland (1796) 1811-1980, (1796) 1811-1980
Inventarisnummer:
GOE-O-1847
Owner:
Zeeuws Archief

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