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My 4x greats, Izaak Boes and Adriana van de Walle, are the second of four Dutch couples that my grandmother, L. Edna Mulder Zuidweg, was descended from.

Ancestry’s bio for Izaak reads this way:

Izaak Boes was born in 1805 in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands, the son of Maria and Jannis. He married Adriana Vandewalle and they had 10 children together. He then married Cornelia van de Merrelaar and they had two children together. He died on March 13, 1891, in his hometown, having lived a long life of 86 years.

Keep in mind that as I get new information this will change.

Adriana Vandewalle was born in 1809 in Groede, Zeeland, Netherlands, the daughter of Maria and Januarius. She married Izaak Boes on March 24, 1830, in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands. They had 10 children in 12 years. She died as a young mother on December 15, 1842, in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 33.

Poor Adriana. She died at 33, whereas Izaak lived to be double that plus twenty!!! Adriana passed away 8 days after her son Izaak Jacobus Boes was born.  Without his mother’s care perhaps, Izaak died in April of the following year.

I am going by their marriage record that Izaak was born in Ijzendijke and Adriana born in Groede. I do not have a birth or baptismal record for either.

This is the marriage record for the couple:

 

Here is the index:

Adriana’s death record:

And the index:

Here is Izaak’s second marriage to Cornelia van de Merrelaar:

Here is the index:

Izaak died:

Here is the index for his death record:

Cornelia passed away 8 days after Izaak.

Index:

Although Izaak and Cornelia were elderly and both without occupations when they passed away, at the time of Izaak’s first marriage, he was listed as a dressmaker. Adriana was listed as a maid, but I am guessing that was just until she married. The same was true of both Izaak and Cornelia when he remarried.

I find that a very interesting occupation for a man in those days. A dressmaker, not a tailor. I wonder what that means. Does one signify more training and experience than the other? Or is a dressmaker as it sounds–a person who sews dresses? This is the kind of information I would love to explore, but I don’t have the foggiest idea of how to find this stuff out.

 

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This post was originally briefly published a while back. At the time I was ill and had forgotten that I had set this post to publish at that time. Because I wanted to be able to respond to comments, I took it down and didn’t re-post until today. I have a real “gift” from the Arizona desert, Valley Fever. It’s a fungal infection of the lungs that can spread to other parts of the body. I have been doing a lot of sleeping! But this post is a pretty exciting one for me, so I didn’t want to delay too much. 

The 2x great-grandparents of my grandmother, L. Edna Mulder Zuidweg, were my 4x greats, Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille. Grandma always said we had some French heritage. Obviously she was well-trained in her own ancestry because she was right. The French connection came from Rose Melanie and her family.

Karel Mulder was born on 3 December 1812 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands. (20) Karel, a shoemaker, married Rose Melanie Bataille on 5 May 1836 in Goes. (22)

What an exciting discovery I made when I searched wiewaswie for that marriage record.

As I pulled up the record itself (the record was free and immediately available), I saw a very familiar name: ADRIAAN ZUIDWEG! Yes, that’s my grandfather’s name. And his father’s name. And HIS grandfather’s name. And this was indeed my great-grandfather’s grandfather. I’ve already written about this Adriaan, the tailor, and his wife, Johanna Mulder. Johanna is our current (the one I’m writing about today) Karel’s brother.

Was this a double wedding? Yes! It was. Both brother and sister married their betrothed at the same ceremony. You can see on the documents that all four parents signed each record, and that many of the witnesses are the same.

What makes this even more exciting is that Karel and Rose Melanie were my grandmother’s ancestors and that Adriaan and Johanna were my grandfather’s ancestors!!!!

Rose Melanie was born about 1810 in Etaples France. (21). At the time of her marriage she was a servant in Goes. (21) I don’t know how she ended up in Goes, but her family had immigrated or moved to the Netherlands from France. The reason I mention it could have been considered a “move” is that at that time the Netherlands was part of the French empire. It looks like Rose Melanie’s sister got married in Goes a couple of years before RM did. She married Jan de Munck.

At the time of his death in Goes at age 57, on 3 January 1870, Karel owned 3/8 of a house and yard in the “Papegaaistraatje [Parrot Street]” district. Rose died on 10 July 1887 at the age of 77 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.23 Karel and Rose Melanie had become quite prosperous from shoemaking and then perhaps retail. When Rose Melanie passed away, she probably left my 2x great-grandfather Pieter Mulder, an orphan, an inheritance that enabled him to bring his young family to the United States. You can read about Rose Melanie’s passing and also about Karel’s familly Bijbel (Bible) that still exists in this post: A Mulder Connection.

Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille had the following children:
i. Karel Mulder, born 21 February 1837, Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands; died 22 April 1881, Goes,
Zeeland, the Netherlands. Karel was my 3x great-grandfather.
ii. Pieter Philip Mulder was born on 29 August 1838 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.24
iii. Kornelis Mulder was born on 4 September 1840 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.25 He died on 3 June
1887 at the age of 46 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.26 On 3 June 1887 he was a shoemaker in Goes,
Zeeland, the Netherlands.26
iv. Melanie Mulder was born on 21 January 1842 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.27 She died on 23 June
1884 at the age of 42 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.28
v. Johannes Mulder was born on 12 November 1843 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.29 He died on 7
January 1849 at the age of 5 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.30
vi. Andries Mulder was born on 23 January 1846 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.31
vii. Jan Mulder was born on 9 December 1848 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.32 On 22 April 1881 he was
a shopkeeper in paint and colonial goods in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.5
viii. Johannes Mulder was born on 10 February 1851 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.33 He died on 26
June 1876 at the age of 25 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.34 On 26 June 1876 he was a shoemaker in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.34
ix. Jacobus Mulder was born on 13 May 1856 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.35 He died on 17 June 1874
at the age of 18 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.36 On 17 June 1874 he was a shopkeeper’s assistant in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.36

So I thought to myself: what am I missing? Only Rose Melanie’s birth record and if there are any military records on Karel. I have death records for both and a birth record for Karel. The fact that I also have images of the Bijbel is an added treasure, thanks to distant cousin Elly Mulder.

Then another wonderful treasure landed in my lap from Elly. She had seen this post when it accidentally published for a few minutes and knew I was in need of Rose Melanie’s birth record. Elly sent me the record.

Elly has had the pleasure of visiting Etaples. Here is her photo of the city hall.

Etaples

The following photo Elly says is an old building found in the same square as the city hall.

Living in Arizona I rarely get to see really old buildings in person. Thank you for these treasures, Elly!

***

SOURCES (this is a partial list–the sources used by Yvette Hoitink in 2013)

5. Goes office, “Memorie van successie [Death duties tax file],” Karel Mulder, died 22 April 1881; call number 106, file
number 4/1940; Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg, Netherlands.

20. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, birth record, 1812, [unnumbered], Karel Mulder, 2 December 1812; digital images,
Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
21. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, marriage record, 1836, 16, Mulder-Bataille, 5 May 1836; digital images, Familysearch
(http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
22. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, death record, 1870, 1, Karel Mulder, 3 January 1870; digital images, Familysearch
(http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
23. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, death record, 1887, 90, Rose Melanie Bataille, 10 July 1887; digital images,
Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
24. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Pieter Philip Mulder, 29 August 1838
Endnotes 16 August

25. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Kornelis Mulder, 4 September 1840
26. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Kornelis Mulder, 3 June 1887
27. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Melanie Mulder, 21 January 1842
28. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Melanie Mulder, 23 June 1884
29. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Johannes Mulder, 12 November 1843
30. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Johannes Mulder, 7 January 1849
31. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Andries Mulder, 23 January 1846
32. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Jan Mulder, 9 December 1848
33. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 1851), database, entry for
birth record of Johannes Mulder, 10 February 1851
34. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Johannes Mulder, 26 June 1876
35. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Jacobus Mulder, 13 May 1856
36. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Jacobus Mulder, 17 June 1874

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Although I have not found a baptismal record for Dirk, I suspect he was born in Lexmond, Zuid-Holland. His parents are associated with that town, his wife Aaltje was born and died there, and Dirk was a farmer in Lexmond, so he probably owned a farm.

While I do not have a baptismal record for Aaltje either, the couple’s marriage document (I have the index, but not the record itself) shows that the marriage took place in Lexmond and states that Aaltje was born in Lexmond on 19 November 1793. Dirk was about four years older than his wife, so he probably was born in or around 1789.

For both Dirk and Aaltje I have death index records, but not the death records themselves. Aaltje passed away on 16 August 1829 at the age of 35. She had given birth to at least seven children. One of the children died at age 5, one at age 20, and two more at age 23 (they were not twins–these deaths were years apart). That left my 3x great-grandmother who died at 41 and her two sisters who died in their early 70s.

At first I thought it was strange that Dirk died in Meerkerk instead of Lexmond, but upon consulting a map I once again discovered how close these towns are: 7 kilometers apart. Here is the index of his death record:

And here is Aaltje’s:

What was Dirk’s life like for the forty years after Aaltje died? It’s hard to believe that a farmer wouldn’t remarry. He would need a partner in running the place. The only other thing I can think of is that one of his children and his/her spouse lived there and helped him manage life on the farm. Of course, after his first born, a son, died at age 20, the other surviving children were all girls.

If I were able to do a heritage tour of the Netherlands, Goes and Zwolle and Lexmond would be the three towns to focus on. Although I thought my Dutch ancestors were mainly from Zeeland when I began this project, I see that they are also from Overijssel province and Zuid-Holland province. However, Lexmond was in Zuid-Holland, but is now in the province of Utrecht.

The Dutch Reformed church building in Lexmond dates from the 13th century. I hope to eventually see how far back I can find family in Lexmond.

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Another set of ancestors of Richard DeKorn and my grandfather Adrian Zuidweg are my 4x great-grandparents, Joost Peek and his wife, Annigje van Besten.

I wrote a couple of blog posts about their son, Teunis, who was a pioneer of Kalamazoo, Michigan: 3x greats Teunis and Jacoba (Bassa) Peek, part I and 3x greats Teunis and Jacoba (Bassa) Peek, part II

As I explained previously, the name Paak used most often by my family in the United States was actually Peek in the Netherlands. It is possible they were going for a more phonetically correct spelling (by American English standards).

These are the life stories from Ancestry:

When Joost Peek was born on October 28, 1787, in Zijderveld, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, his father, Cornelis, was 41 and his mother, Teuntje, was 34. He married Annigje den Besten on September 28, 1814, in Everdingen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands. They had six children in 13 years. He died on November 29, 1832, in Everdingen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, at the age of 45.

Annigje den Besten was born in 1785 in Everdingen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, the daughter of Maaike and Jan. She married Joost Peek on September 28, 1814, in her hometown. They had six children in 13 years. She died on April 3, 1865, having lived a long life of 80 years.

One of those six children, Maaike, died in infanthood.

I have been blessed with most of the pertinent records on these two. I do still need a baptism record for Annigje and military record for Joost, but I have Joost’s baptismal record, as well as their marriage record and death records for both.

This is the front cover of the book that contains their marriage record.

 

 

 

And this is the marriage record:

Instead of posting Joost’s death record, I will post the transcription and translation that was done through a Facebook group by Carla Ratcliff. Where it says “I” it is Carla. We learn from this record that Joost was a builder by trade.

Transcription in Dutch : #19
In het jaar achttien honderd twee en dertig, den dertigsten der maand November, des voor middags ten tien ure, zijn voor ons Jan Hendrick Kny (ij)tt Burgemeister Ambtenaar van den Burgerlijken Stand der Gemeente van Overdengen gecompareered: Antonie van Ooijen oud vijfen en derig Jaren, van beroep Bouwman wonende te Everdingen en Andries van Meeuwen oud vie ren dertig Jaren van beroep Bouwman, wonende te Everdingen die ons verklaard hebben, dat op den negen en twintigste der maand November des jaars achttien honderd twee en dertig, des morgens ten drie ure, binnen deze Gemeente is overladen: J (I) oost Peek oud vijfen veertig Jaren Bouwman wonende te Everdingen den ag ten twintigste October zeventien honderd vijf en tagtig  geboren te zij (y)derveld?, echtgenoot van Annnigje den Besten zonder beroep aldaar woonachtig zoon van Cornelis Peek en van Taientje van Zenderen beide overleden. En hebben wij declaranten een geburen met ins deze acte na gedane voorlezin onderteekend.

[DeepL translations are done by a DeepL machine]

deepl translation : #19 ( I made corrections to deep l  translations!!)
In the year eighteen hundred and thirty-two, the thirtieth of November, at ten o’clock in the afternoon, Jan Hendrick Kny (ij)tt Burgemeister Civil Servant of the civil registration of the city of Overdengen( has been composed for us) gecompareered = APPEARED BEFORE ME: Antonie van Ooijen, (aged five and thirteen years) 35 years old, by profession ( Bouwman) BUILDER, living in Everdingen, and Andries van Meeuwen, aged thirty one years, by profession (Bouwman) BUILDER, living in Everdingen, who have declared to us that on the (ninth and twentieth) 29th day of November of the year eighteen hundred thirty-two, in the morning at three o’clock, (there were overloaded)ALSO IN THIS IN CITY: Joost Peek, aged forty-five years (Bouwman) BUILDER , residing in Everdingen, on the twentieth of October seventeen hundred and thirty-five, born in his (y)derveld?, husband of Annnigje den Besten, son of Cornelis Peek and of Tientje van Zenderen, both residing there without profession, both (showered) DEAD. And we have signed a letter to the declarants with in this act after the preceding sentence.

From this death record, we can see that even the witnesses to Joost’s death were all builders.

Annigje outlived Joost for over thirty years. She also died “elsewhere,” in Vianen. This death town caused me all kinds of frustration until I bothered to look up Everdingen where she was born, married, and lived. I discovered this in Wikipedia: “Everdingen is a former municipality in the Netherlands. Together with Zijderveld and Hagestein, it had been part of Vianen municipality since 1986.”  So all these little towns were very close. When Annigje was in her 60s she lived in Hagestein. Joost was from Zijderveld.

This city gate of Vianen is from the 15th century.

By User:China_Crisis – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2214906

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Like the great-greats in my last post, Jan and Geertruijd (Engelse) de Korne, Dirk Gillesz Remijnse and his wife, Adriana Krijger (Kriger), are ancestors of Richard DeKorn, the man who had a great influence on my grandfather. Richard was Grandpa’s grandfather, and he lived with his parents at the home of Richard. Richard’s given name was Dirk, so he was named after his grandfather, Dirk Gillesz Remijnse.

By the way, according to Family Search:

In Dutch the word for son is zoon; in Old Dutch, it is soen, zoen or soon, which can be abbreviated to sz, z, se, sen and x. Daughter in Dutch is dochter and in Old Dutch it is doghter which can be abbreviated to d, dr, s, se, sen, sens, and x.

Using this info, we can see that Dirk Gillesz means that his father’s name was Gillis or Gilles.

According to Dirk’s and Adriana’s life stories on Ancestry:

When Dirk Gillesz Remijnse was born on November 22, 1786, in Kruiningen, Zeeland, Netherlands, his father, Gillis, was 29 and his mother, Hendrika, was 23. He married Adriana Krijger on August 26, 1810, in Kapelle, Zeeland, Netherlands. They had ten children in 15 years. He died on September 9, 1840, in Kapelle, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 53.

When Adriana Krijger was born on June 11, 1787, in Biggekerke, Zeeland, Netherlands, her father, Jan, was 53, and her mother, Janna, was 31. She married Dirk Gillesz Remijnse on August 26, 1810, in Kapelle, Zeeland, Netherlands. They had ten children in 15 years. She died on April 14, 1845, in Kapelle, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 57.

I would add that of these ten children, nine lived to adulthood, whereas Pieter died at age 8. It is possible that there were other babies who passed away, but I have not yet searched for them. For the most part, these children are 1-2 years apart, though, so it’s likely that the family was blessed with good odds (for those days) and that the majority of their children survived.

I found a death record for both husband and wife.

Dirk’s record:

Index of Dirk’s death record:

Adriana’s death record:

Index of Adriana’s death record:

I have not found a marriage record for this couple, nor a baptismal record for Dirk. But I did finally find a baptismal record for Adriana and ordered it from Zeeuws Archief. It arrived in time for this post!

At the birth of their daughter, Johanna, my 3x great-grandmother (who died in Kalamazoo in 1864), Dirk’s occupation was listed as bread baker. Probably a good thing, since he had all those mouths to feed! But think of him getting up really early and getting the ovens going. A pretty hard job, although a good smelling one.

I must confess that the birth date for Dirk and the marriage date that I show come from online family trees on “genealogy online,” a Dutch site. I do not have documents verifying them. So let’s just use them as place holders for now. Of course, the birth years are fairly accurate because of the ages listed on the death records, but I still need those documents!

Adriana was born in Biggekerke. This is a “ground sailor,” which is a term for a windmill that can be operated from the ground. Brassers Molen is a flour mill that was built in 1712, so it had already been around for quite some time when Adriana was born in 1787.

Brassers Molen from Wikipedia

Dirk hailed from Kruinengen, and that town also has an old flour windmill, Oude Molen (literally, Old Mill). This one was built in 1801 when Dirk was 25 years old.

Oude Molen from Wikipedia

If you would like to understand the role of some windmills in controlling the water in below-sea-level Netherlands, read Eilene’s wonderful post: Milling Water to the Sea

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My 3x great-grandfather, Boudewijn DeKorn and his wife, Johanna Remine, were the first generation in the DeKorn branch to immigrate to the United States. Boudewijn’s parents, Jan and Geertruijd (Engelse) de Korne (de Corne) were the last generation of my direct ancestors to remain in the Netherlands. By the time that the younger couple had emigrated in 1856, Boudewijn’s parents were already deceased.

Jan had passed away nine years before, on 10 November 1847 in Kapelle, Zeeland, Netherlands, at age 54. Although I knew that my 2x great-grandfather Richard DeKorn was born in Kapelle, I think this is pretty much the same area as Goes, where so much of the family came from. In fact, the cities are only 7 kilometers apart (less than 4.5 miles!).

Jan was born on or around 16 November 1792 in Kattendijke, but this is a village in Goes. This shows that this portion of the family was in Goes before the move to Kapelle. Kloetinge is another village in the city of Goes that I have seen mentioned in my relatives’ records.

This is a copy of Jan’s baptismal record.

Geertruijd had already been gone for some time when her husband passed. She died at age 40 on 23 May 1829 in Kapelle, just a few weeks after the birth of her son Pieter. She was born in Kruinengen, about 17 kilometers from Goes, so not far from Kapelle either, on or around 22 April 1789.

The couple was married on 22 April 1814 in Kapelle. According to Yvette Hoitink: “The marriage record of Jan de Korne and Geertruijd Engelse was found in the ZeeuwenGezocht.nl index of civil registration records. They were married in Kapelle on 22 April 1814. Scans of the 1814 marriage records of Kapelle are missing from the “Netherlands, Civil Registration, 1792-1952″ set of images at Familysearch.org so the original text has not been consulted. The (reliable) index provides the names of his parents: Boudewijn de Korne and Jacoba Loenhout and gives his age (21) and place of birth (Kattendijke).” Therefore, I do not have a copy of their marriage record.

At the time of their marriage, I believe that Jan was already living in Kapelle and working as a farmer. Whether his father or he owned a farm, I do not know. But he is listed as a farmer, not a laborer or day laborer, so it is likely that there was a family farm. I don’t know what brought Geertruijd to Kapelle.

After fifteen years of marriage and two living children (my 3x great Boudewijn and his brother Pieter–there were at least two infants who died, as well), Jan was left a widower. On 19 October 1832, he married Elizabeth Zandijk. After she passed away on or around 16 April 1833 (six months after their marriage!!!!), Jan married another Elizabeth. This third wife was Elizabeth Bustraan, and their marriage began on 16 April 1841 in Kapelle. I do not have a date for her death.

I do have copies of the marriage records for Jan’s second and third marriages.

I have a death record for both Jan and Geertruijd. Here is Jan’s.

And here is Geertuijd’s:

 

I hope to eventually find the couple’s marriage record. Additionally, I am looking for Geertruijd’s baptismal record and any evidence of a military record for Jan.

 

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Johannes, or Jan, Dansser (also Danser) is a bit of a mystery man, as is his wife, Maria Inkelaar. I have no documents on either one of them, although I do have a death index on Maria.

Yvette Hoitink had originally given me this information on the couple:

Johannes Dansser was born about 1772. On 13 Oct 1825 he was a day laborer in Zwolle, Overijssel, the
Netherlands.
Maria Inkelaar lived in Zwolle, Overijssel, the Netherlands on 13 Oct 1825.
Johannes Dansser and Maria Inkelaar had the following child:
Jeuntien Dansser, born 26 Apr 1806, Zwolle, Overijssel, the Netherlands; died bef 4 Nov 1869.

She got these facts from the marriage record of their daughter Jeuntien Dansser to Lukas Bomhof: “Zwolle, Overijssel, the Netherlands, marriage record, 1825, 75, Lucas Bomhof-Jeuntjen Dansser, 13 October 1825; digital images, Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11514-26006-7?cc=1831469&wc=10704172 : accessed 23 December 2012)”

Subsequently, I discovered a death index for Jeuntien (or Johanna) with the death date of 31 January 1842, rather than “bef Nov 1869.”

As with the Bomhofs of this generation, I suspect that they were farm laborers or peasants in Zwolle. Also, this is the other couple who resided in the province of Overijssel, and the records seem more difficult to come by than in Zeeland. Still, I believe their daughter did well for herself to marry Lukas who turned out to be an enterprising man and a musketeer at Waterloo against Napoleon.

By Nummer 12 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15768309

View of City Center of Zwolle

This completes half the 4x grandparents who are ancestors of my grandfather, Adrian Zuidweg. The Zuijdweg (den Herder), Mulder (Cornaaij), Bomhof (Janssen), and Dansser (Inkelaar) families were all ancestors of Grandpa’s father, Adrian Zuidweg, Sr.

The occupations of the men were fish inspector, jailor’s hand, day laborer (peasant), and day laborer (peasant).

The men died at ages 60, 67, 60, and unknown. My great-grandfather Adriaan died at 58, his father Johannes at 68, Johannes’ father Adriaan at 46, and Johannes’ father-in-law Lukas at 58. My grandfather lived to be 91.

The 4x women died at ages 58, 81, 73, and unknown. Maria’s age is unknown, but she died in 1837. If she was born around 1772, that would have had made her 65.

Eventually, I hope to be able to fill in some of these gaps about the Dansser/Inkelaar family, as well as the Bomhof/Janssen family. When I do fill in the gaps, I plan to revise the fill-in-the-gaps posts that I am writing.

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Now we come to the parents of Lukas Bomhof, the Waterloo musketeer, and the grandparents of my 2x great-grandmother, Jennie Zuidweg, who died in Kalamazoo at age 85. The library in Kalamazoo must have opened back up because they sent me Jennie’s obit that I had ordered at the start of the pandemic. It doesn’t say anything new, but it is nice to have. For now I will post it here, but eventually I plan to move it to Jennie’s fill-in-the-gap post.

This image was enhanced by the My Heritage program to clear up the blurry newsprint. Here is what it says about Jennie:

Mrs. Jennie Zuideweg (sic), 85, died at the home of her daughter, Johanna Van Liere, 1208 S. Burdick Street, Saturday. Funeral services will be held from the home Tuesday afternoon at 2:00. The Reverend William Van Vliet will officiate, and burial will be in Riverside Cemetery.

Mrs. Zuideweg (sic) is survived by a son Adrian; her daughter, and nine grandchildren.

Jennie’s grandfather, Albert Hendriks Bomhof, was originally known as Albert Nijentap. Around 1812, Albert changed the family surname (including that of his three adult sons) to Bomhof (in Windesheim, Overijssel). According to Yvette Hoitink, “in the province of Overijssel, it was common to be named after the farm you lived on. It was only with the French occupation that people were obliged to take a hereditary surname. Nijentap may be the name of the farm that the family lived at.” I need a little more understanding of that because I believe the French occupation lasted only until 1813, so 1812 is a pretty late date to change the name.

Albert was born about 1756, based on his death record which states that he was sixty when he died on 8 May 1816 in Windesheim. So Albert changed their name only four years before he died.

You see where this leads with Albert’s son Lukas, my 3x great grandfather. Since he was born Lukas Nijentap, maybe I wasn’t looking for his baptism record under the right name; I will have to revisit the search for the birth information on Lukas.

Albert married Zwaantje Janssen (possibly Janssen van Rijssen). The couple had the following children: Lukas Nijentap/Bomhof, born 9 Dec 1788, Windesheim, Overijssel, the Netherlands; Jan Nijentap/Bomhof (born about 1786); and Hendrik Nijentap/Bomhof (born about 1787).

This information was found by Yvette Hoitink in these two places:

1. Zwolle, Overijssel, the Netherlands, marriage supplements, 1825, 75, Lucas Bomhof-Jeuntien Dansser, 13 October
1825; digital images, Familysearch
(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-15331-25133-30?cc=1831469&wc=10704236 : accessed 24 December 2012)
2. Zwolle, Overijssel, the Netherlands, marriage record, 1825, 75, Lucas Bomhof-Jeuntjen Dansser, 13 October 1825;
digital images, Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11514-26006-7?cc=1831469&wc=10704172 :
accessed 23 December 2012)

I do not have a marriage record for Albert and Zwaantje, nor do I have birth/baptism records for either one of them. I don’t even have their exact dates and places of birth.

So many of my Dutch ancestors seem to have been people from towns with the sort of occupations that were found in towns. My conjecture about Albert is that he was a farm laborer, perhaps more like a peasant. Since his son Lukas became an innkeeper and then a shoemaker it seems likely that Lukas may have somewhat improved his situation by his time as a soldier.

While I don’t have Zwaantje’s death record, I do have one for Albert (as I mentioned, age sixty on 8 May 1816).

I thought a map to locate Windesheim and Zwolle, or the province of Overijssel, would be useful.

See where Overijssel is on the east side of the country? That is where Windesheim and Zwolle are. But most of my ancestors lived in Zeeland (far southwest of the country) and even South Holland and Utrecht–all in a row. Albert’s granddaughter, my great-great-grandmother Jennie Zuidweg, who died in Kalamazoo, traveled all the way from Zwolle to Goes where she married Johannes Zuijdweg (later John Zuidweg). She apparently followed her brother to Goes, but how he ended up there I don’t yet know. Jennie also was probably not like the town people in Goes. She traveled the farthest that I’ve found so far in terms of distance and probably lifestyle.

Here is arguably the most famous building in Windesheim.

By Onderwijsgek at nl.wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0 nl, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=635630

What is now the Reformed Church was a famous monastery, known as the Windesheim Canons. This place was known for people like Thomas a’ Kempis, Johann Busch, Gabriel Biel, and Erasmus. Eventually the Reformation brought destruction to part of the campus. The property was owned by a farmer in the 19th century, before becoming the home of the Reformed Church in Windesheim. I’m sure that the complete history of this building would make an exciting book or movie.

Knowing this about Windesheim and also that it is now the location of The Windesheim University of Applied Sciences makes it harder to swallow that Albert Bomhof was a peasant. All that education so nearby. All that fascinating history evolving within walking distance. All happening while he was working in the fields for someone else.

 

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Did you catch that in the title? Carel and Johanna are both my 4x great-grandparents and my 5x great-grandparents!

How is that possible? Through my maternal grandfather, Carel and Johanna are my 4X greats, the parents of Johanna Mulder who married Adriaan Zuijdweg, the tailor. Through my maternal grandmother, Carel and Johanna are my 5x greats, as they were also the parents of Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille who I haven’t even scanned for gaps yet since they are 4X and I only just started working on 4X!

I have not found a baptism or birth record for Johanna, but believe she was born around 1782 (based on her death record) and probably in Middelburg, which is the capital city of Zeeland. Carel was baptized in Goes on 8 March 1780. Here is the record.

1 – Zeeuws Archief

I have an index for the marriage of Carel and Johanna in April 1803, but not a copy of the record itself. They were married in Middelburg. I do not know what brought Carel to Middelburg to meet Johanna. By 1812 he was a shopkeeper in Goes.

I do have death records for both Carel and Johanna.

We happen to have a little more info about Carel than some of these other ancestors from this long-ago period as there are documents that give an idea of what was going on in his life.

After being a shopkeeper, Carel worked as a prison guard, or assistant of the jailor. In 1841, he got in trouble when he didn’t show proper submission to the jailor. He was suspended for four weeks without pay. I prefer to believe that his boss was a jerk and the suspension was unavoidable.

In 1846, Carel suffered from a debilitating illness that made it impossible for him to continue working. His son-in-law Pieter Steutel was allowed to substitute for him. Pieter was the husband of Carel and Johanna’s oldest child, Jacoba.

My many times removed cousin Elly Mulder provided me with two articles about Carel’s pension. The other information came to me from Yvette Hoitink (* see her research at the end of the post). I am sorry, but the articles are not translated. (A future project is to get translations of each document in my collection, but that will have to wait for now).

Carel Mulder was honorably discharged on 31 August 1846. After a lot of bureaucracy, he was awarded a pension by Royal Decree on 11 March 1847 (starting 1 September 1846). He died just two months after the final decision.

I would love to know more about the jail and what it was like in those days, 200 years ago. What did it look like? What was the job of a “jailer’s hand” like? Did it contribute to Carel’s illness?

###

*Yvette’s research:

Carel Mulder37–39 was born about March 1780 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.40 He was baptized on 8 March 1780 in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.40 On 3 December 1812 he was a shopkeeper in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.20 On 6
November 1829 Carel was a jailor’s hand.41 On 29 December 1831 he was a jailor’s hand.42 On 5 May 1836 he was a jailor’s
hand in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.21,37 Carel witnessed the declaration of the birth of Karel Mulder on 21 February
1837 at C 129 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.8 On 21 February 1837 he was a jailor’s hand in Goes, Zeeland, the
Netherlands.8 On 10 May 1838 he was a jailor’s hand.43 On 12 December 1841 Carel was a prison guard at the house of
arrest in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.44–45 He insulted a jailor and did not show him the submission he was supposed to.
He was suspended by the governor of Zeeland for a period of four weeks without pay. On 5 June 1846 he was a prison
guard in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.46 He was too ill to do his job as a prison guard, so the regents of the prison that his
son-in-law Pieter Steutel could take over for him On 31 August 1846 he was discharged as a prison guard. On 11 March
1847, the King awarded Karel Mulder a pension of 104 guilders, starting 1 September 1846.47 Carel died on 19 May 1847 at
the age of 67 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.39 He was also known as Karel Mulder. Johanna Cornaaij and Carel Mulder were married on 22 April 1803 in Middelburg, Zeeland, the Netherlands.48

Johanna Cornaaij37–38 was born about 1782 in Middelburg, Zeeland, the Netherlands.49 She lived in Goes, Zeeland, the
Netherlands on 5 May 1836.21,37 She died on 26 May 1863 at the age of 81 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.49

Endnotes from Yvette Hoitink:

37. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, marriage record, 1836, 15, Adriaan Zuidweg-Johanna Mulder, 5 May 1836; digital
images, Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11539-85068-10?cc=1831469&wc=10707155 :
accessed 23 December 2012)
38. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1878, 55, Johanna Mulder, 11 June 1878; digital images,
Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-20033-21?cc=1831469&wc=10707221 : accessed 23
December 2012)
39. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1847, 140, Carel Mulder, 19 May 1847; digital images, Familysearch
(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-33066-75?cc=1831469&wc=10707218 : accessed 24 December 2012)
40. Dutch Reformed Church (Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands), “Doop Boek van de Gereformeerde kerke der stad Goes,
zijnde begonnen met den jare 1768 [Baptism book of the Reformed Church of the city Goes, being started in the year 1768]”,
unpaginated, Carel Mulder, 8 March 1780; digital images, Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013).
41. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Cornelis Mulder and Janneke de Zeeuw, 6 November 1829
42. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Pieter Steutel and Jacoba Johanna Mulder, 29 December 1831
43. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Johannes Mulder and Henderika Johanna Hogesteger, 10 May 1838
44. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849; “Strafinrichtingen [Prisons] Zeeland,” record group 254, call number 4;
Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg, Zeeland, Netherlands, p. 158-159v.
45. Governor of Zeeland, letter, to Regents of house of arrest of Goes, 20 December 1841; Relatieven serie ‘A’, Eerste
Afdeling [correspondence series A, first deparment], 16-31 December 1841, letter 12269; “Provinciaal Bestuur van Zeeland
[Provincial government of Zeeland] 1813-1850.” record group 6.1, call number 795; Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg,
Netherlands.
46. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849, p. 207v.
47. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849, p. 227v.
48. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 14 June 2013), database, entry for
“trouwgeld [marriage dues] Carel Mulder en Johanna Carnaay”, 22 April 1803
49. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1863, 72, Johanna Cornaaij, 26 May 1863; digital images,
Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-36032-73?cc=1831469&wc=10707220 : accessed 24
December 2012)

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Now I move into the 4x great-grandparents. The information gets scanty, and this generation did not immigrate to the United States. I’m going to start with my maternal grandfather’s ancestors–once again, because the inspiration for this blog came from his family.

Grandpa’s surname Zuidweg came from Cornelis Zuijdweg, who was born on 22 5 May 1781 in Goes, the son of Adriana and Paulus.

He was born during the Fourth Anglo-Dutch War, a conflict between Great Britain and the Dutch Republic between 1780-1784. This war was somewhat related to the American Revolutionary War because it had to do with whether it was legal for the Dutch to trade with Britain’s enemies in the ARW. The Dutch Republic was the second European country to diplomatically recognize the Continental Congress, less than a year after Cornelis was born. 

This painting is of The Battle of Dogger Bank, which took place the year Cornelis was born, between the Dutch and the British. You can read about it on Wikipedia.

The Dutch were led in battle by Vice Admiral Johan Zoutman.

Cornelis married Geertrui den Herder who was born on 22 May 1780 12 December 1779 in Kloetinge (which is next to Goes), the daughter of Antona and Adriaan. The name Den Herder probably means “The Shepherd.” The couple married on 4 January 1803, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands. They had at least two children during their marriage, Adriaan (1805 – 1851), my 3x great-grandfather, and Antonia Adriana (1810-1881) who married Johan Pieter den Boer. 

Cornelis worked as a fish inspector and, possibly, some other type of inspector. However, at the time of the wedding of their daughter Antonia to Johan, Cornelis is listed as a shopkeeper. Geertrui is listed as a laborer at one point, so it’s probable that she worked for someone else.

Geertrui died on 22 May 1838 in Goes, at the age of 58.

Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, Geertruida den Herder, 22 May 1838

Just over a year later, Cornelis married Catharina Geertrui van Kleef on 25 July 1839, in Goes. He died on 9 November 1841, also in Goes, at the age of 60.

Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, Cornelis Zuijdweg, 9 November 1841

Did you notice all those May 22 dates? Here is what I know: Geertrui’s death record in 1838 is definitely May 22. But the other May 22 dates? They came from other sources, and I don’t believe them.   I no sooner published this post than Yvon Rijshouwer of Gouda responded with some more information from the Population Register in the Goes archives (which I did not know exists). Geertrui was a married housewife of the Reformed faith. Kornelis was a fish inspector of the Reformed faith. I have adjusted the birth dates of both Kornelis and Geertrui based upon Yvon’s information. They are no longer May 22!

Here is the address in Goes where the family lived.

Source: Bevolkingsregister 1831-1836, wijk D,
Street: J.A. van der Goeskade Tussen de 2 Poorten. (between the two gates)
Kornelis lives there with
Geertrui den Herder, wife,
Adriaan Zuidweg, son, born 28/1/1805, Goes, tailor
Benjamin Kornelis den Boer , grandson. born 13/5/1831, Goes.
Oh my, so son Adriaan lived there because he wasn’t yet married apparently. He was married in 1836. But why was the grandson living with them when Kornelis and Geertrui’s daughter and son-in-law were not? Was it a temporary situation? I believe the couple was still alive. This baby, “Benjamin Kornelis,” was already in my records, but as Kornelis Benjamin.
I do not have copies of the couple’s birth records. I don’t even have their marriage record, although annoyingly I have the marriage record between Cornelis and his 2nd wife, Catharina van Kleef.

So I am looking for both birth/baptism records, their marriage record, and possibly any military history for Cornelis. Onward!

P.S. And now I have this new online source: https://gemeentearchief.goes.nl/

 

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