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Archive for the ‘Mulder’ Category

My 4x greats, Izaak Boes and Adriana van de Walle, are the second of four Dutch couples that my grandmother, L. Edna Mulder Zuidweg, was descended from.

Ancestry’s bio for Izaak reads this way:

Izaak Boes was born in 1805 in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands, the son of Maria and Jannis. He married Adriana Vandewalle and they had 10 children together. He then married Cornelia van de Merrelaar and they had two children together. He died on March 13, 1891, in his hometown, having lived a long life of 86 years.

Keep in mind that as I get new information this will change.

Adriana Vandewalle was born in 1809 in Groede, Zeeland, Netherlands, the daughter of Maria and Januarius. She married Izaak Boes on March 24, 1830, in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands. They had 10 children in 12 years. She died as a young mother on December 15, 1842, in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 33.

Poor Adriana. She died at 33, whereas Izaak lived to be double that plus twenty!!! Adriana passed away 8 days after her son Izaak Jacobus Boes was born.  Without his mother’s care perhaps, Izaak died in April of the following year.

I am going by their marriage record that Izaak was born in Ijzendijke and Adriana born in Groede. I do not have a birth or baptismal record for either.

This is the marriage record for the couple:

 

Here is the index:

Adriana’s death record:

And the index:

Here is Izaak’s second marriage to Cornelia van de Merrelaar:

Here is the index:

Izaak died:

Here is the index for his death record:

Cornelia passed away 8 days after Izaak.

Index:

Although Izaak and Cornelia were elderly and both without occupations when they passed away, at the time of Izaak’s first marriage, he was listed as a dressmaker. Adriana was listed as a maid, but I am guessing that was just until she married. The same was true of both Izaak and Cornelia when he remarried.

I find that a very interesting occupation for a man in those days. A dressmaker, not a tailor. I wonder what that means. Does one signify more training and experience than the other? Or is a dressmaker as it sounds–a person who sews dresses? This is the kind of information I would love to explore, but I don’t have the foggiest idea of how to find this stuff out.

 

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This post was originally briefly published a while back. At the time I was ill and had forgotten that I had set this post to publish at that time. Because I wanted to be able to respond to comments, I took it down and didn’t re-post until today. I have a real “gift” from the Arizona desert, Valley Fever. It’s a fungal infection of the lungs that can spread to other parts of the body. I have been doing a lot of sleeping! But this post is a pretty exciting one for me, so I didn’t want to delay too much. 

The 2x great-grandparents of my grandmother, L. Edna Mulder Zuidweg, were my 4x greats, Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille. Grandma always said we had some French heritage. Obviously she was well-trained in her own ancestry because she was right. The French connection came from Rose Melanie and her family.

Karel Mulder was born on 3 December 1812 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands. (20) Karel, a shoemaker, married Rose Melanie Bataille on 5 May 1836 in Goes. (22)

What an exciting discovery I made when I searched wiewaswie for that marriage record.

As I pulled up the record itself (the record was free and immediately available), I saw a very familiar name: ADRIAAN ZUIDWEG! Yes, that’s my grandfather’s name. And his father’s name. And HIS grandfather’s name. And this was indeed my great-grandfather’s grandfather. I’ve already written about this Adriaan, the tailor, and his wife, Johanna Mulder. Johanna is our current (the one I’m writing about today) Karel’s brother.

Was this a double wedding? Yes! It was. Both brother and sister married their betrothed at the same ceremony. You can see on the documents that all four parents signed each record, and that many of the witnesses are the same.

What makes this even more exciting is that Karel and Rose Melanie were my grandmother’s ancestors and that Adriaan and Johanna were my grandfather’s ancestors!!!!

Rose Melanie was born about 1810 in Etaples France. (21). At the time of her marriage she was a servant in Goes. (21) I don’t know how she ended up in Goes, but her family had immigrated or moved to the Netherlands from France. The reason I mention it could have been considered a “move” is that at that time the Netherlands was part of the French empire. It looks like Rose Melanie’s sister got married in Goes a couple of years before RM did. She married Jan de Munck.

At the time of his death in Goes at age 57, on 3 January 1870, Karel owned 3/8 of a house and yard in the “Papegaaistraatje [Parrot Street]” district. Rose died on 10 July 1887 at the age of 77 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.23 Karel and Rose Melanie had become quite prosperous from shoemaking and then perhaps retail. When Rose Melanie passed away, she probably left my 2x great-grandfather Pieter Mulder, an orphan, an inheritance that enabled him to bring his young family to the United States. You can read about Rose Melanie’s passing and also about Karel’s familly Bijbel (Bible) that still exists in this post: A Mulder Connection.

Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille had the following children:
i. Karel Mulder, born 21 February 1837, Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands; died 22 April 1881, Goes,
Zeeland, the Netherlands. Karel was my 3x great-grandfather.
ii. Pieter Philip Mulder was born on 29 August 1838 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.24
iii. Kornelis Mulder was born on 4 September 1840 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.25 He died on 3 June
1887 at the age of 46 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.26 On 3 June 1887 he was a shoemaker in Goes,
Zeeland, the Netherlands.26
iv. Melanie Mulder was born on 21 January 1842 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.27 She died on 23 June
1884 at the age of 42 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.28
v. Johannes Mulder was born on 12 November 1843 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.29 He died on 7
January 1849 at the age of 5 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.30
vi. Andries Mulder was born on 23 January 1846 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.31
vii. Jan Mulder was born on 9 December 1848 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.32 On 22 April 1881 he was
a shopkeeper in paint and colonial goods in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.5
viii. Johannes Mulder was born on 10 February 1851 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.33 He died on 26
June 1876 at the age of 25 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.34 On 26 June 1876 he was a shoemaker in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.34
ix. Jacobus Mulder was born on 13 May 1856 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.35 He died on 17 June 1874
at the age of 18 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.36 On 17 June 1874 he was a shopkeeper’s assistant in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.36

So I thought to myself: what am I missing? Only Rose Melanie’s birth record and if there are any military records on Karel. I have death records for both and a birth record for Karel. The fact that I also have images of the Bijbel is an added treasure, thanks to distant cousin Elly Mulder.

Then another wonderful treasure landed in my lap from Elly. She had seen this post when it accidentally published for a few minutes and knew I was in need of Rose Melanie’s birth record. Elly sent me the record.

Elly has had the pleasure of visiting Etaples. Here is her photo of the city hall.

Etaples

The following photo Elly says is an old building found in the same square as the city hall.

Living in Arizona I rarely get to see really old buildings in person. Thank you for these treasures, Elly!

***

SOURCES (this is a partial list–the sources used by Yvette Hoitink in 2013)

5. Goes office, “Memorie van successie [Death duties tax file],” Karel Mulder, died 22 April 1881; call number 106, file
number 4/1940; Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg, Netherlands.

20. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, birth record, 1812, [unnumbered], Karel Mulder, 2 December 1812; digital images,
Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
21. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, marriage record, 1836, 16, Mulder-Bataille, 5 May 1836; digital images, Familysearch
(http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
22. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, death record, 1870, 1, Karel Mulder, 3 January 1870; digital images, Familysearch
(http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
23. Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, death record, 1887, 90, Rose Melanie Bataille, 10 July 1887; digital images,
Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013)
24. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Pieter Philip Mulder, 29 August 1838
Endnotes 16 August

25. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Kornelis Mulder, 4 September 1840
26. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Kornelis Mulder, 3 June 1887
27. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Melanie Mulder, 21 January 1842
28. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Melanie Mulder, 23 June 1884
29. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Johannes Mulder, 12 November 1843
30. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Johannes Mulder, 7 January 1849
31. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Andries Mulder, 23 January 1846
32. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Jan Mulder, 9 December 1848
33. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 1851), database, entry for
birth record of Johannes Mulder, 10 February 1851
34. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Johannes Mulder, 26 June 1876
35. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for birth record of Jacobus Mulder, 13 May 1856
36. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for death record of Jacobus Mulder, 17 June 1874

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Did you catch that in the title? Carel and Johanna are both my 4x great-grandparents and my 5x great-grandparents!

How is that possible? Through my maternal grandfather, Carel and Johanna are my 4X greats, the parents of Johanna Mulder who married Adriaan Zuijdweg, the tailor. Through my maternal grandmother, Carel and Johanna are my 5x greats, as they were also the parents of Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille who I haven’t even scanned for gaps yet since they are 4X and I only just started working on 4X!

I have not found a baptism or birth record for Johanna, but believe she was born around 1782 (based on her death record) and probably in Middelburg, which is the capital city of Zeeland. Carel was baptized in Goes on 8 March 1780. Here is the record.

1 – Zeeuws Archief

I have an index for the marriage of Carel and Johanna in April 1803, but not a copy of the record itself. They were married in Middelburg. I do not know what brought Carel to Middelburg to meet Johanna. By 1812 he was a shopkeeper in Goes.

I do have death records for both Carel and Johanna.

We happen to have a little more info about Carel than some of these other ancestors from this long-ago period as there are documents that give an idea of what was going on in his life.

After being a shopkeeper, Carel worked as a prison guard, or assistant of the jailor. In 1841, he got in trouble when he didn’t show proper submission to the jailor. He was suspended for four weeks without pay. I prefer to believe that his boss was a jerk and the suspension was unavoidable.

In 1846, Carel suffered from a debilitating illness that made it impossible for him to continue working. His son-in-law Pieter Steutel was allowed to substitute for him. Pieter was the husband of Carel and Johanna’s oldest child, Jacoba.

My many times removed cousin Elly Mulder provided me with two articles about Carel’s pension. The other information came to me from Yvette Hoitink (* see her research at the end of the post). I am sorry, but the articles are not translated. (A future project is to get translations of each document in my collection, but that will have to wait for now).

Carel Mulder was honorably discharged on 31 August 1846. After a lot of bureaucracy, he was awarded a pension by Royal Decree on 11 March 1847 (starting 1 September 1846). He died just two months after the final decision.

I would love to know more about the jail and what it was like in those days, 200 years ago. What did it look like? What was the job of a “jailer’s hand” like? Did it contribute to Carel’s illness?

###

*Yvette’s research:

Carel Mulder37–39 was born about March 1780 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.40 He was baptized on 8 March 1780 in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.40 On 3 December 1812 he was a shopkeeper in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.20 On 6
November 1829 Carel was a jailor’s hand.41 On 29 December 1831 he was a jailor’s hand.42 On 5 May 1836 he was a jailor’s
hand in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.21,37 Carel witnessed the declaration of the birth of Karel Mulder on 21 February
1837 at C 129 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.8 On 21 February 1837 he was a jailor’s hand in Goes, Zeeland, the
Netherlands.8 On 10 May 1838 he was a jailor’s hand.43 On 12 December 1841 Carel was a prison guard at the house of
arrest in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.44–45 He insulted a jailor and did not show him the submission he was supposed to.
He was suspended by the governor of Zeeland for a period of four weeks without pay. On 5 June 1846 he was a prison
guard in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.46 He was too ill to do his job as a prison guard, so the regents of the prison that his
son-in-law Pieter Steutel could take over for him On 31 August 1846 he was discharged as a prison guard. On 11 March
1847, the King awarded Karel Mulder a pension of 104 guilders, starting 1 September 1846.47 Carel died on 19 May 1847 at
the age of 67 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.39 He was also known as Karel Mulder. Johanna Cornaaij and Carel Mulder were married on 22 April 1803 in Middelburg, Zeeland, the Netherlands.48

Johanna Cornaaij37–38 was born about 1782 in Middelburg, Zeeland, the Netherlands.49 She lived in Goes, Zeeland, the
Netherlands on 5 May 1836.21,37 She died on 26 May 1863 at the age of 81 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.49

Endnotes from Yvette Hoitink:

37. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, marriage record, 1836, 15, Adriaan Zuidweg-Johanna Mulder, 5 May 1836; digital
images, Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11539-85068-10?cc=1831469&wc=10707155 :
accessed 23 December 2012)
38. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1878, 55, Johanna Mulder, 11 June 1878; digital images,
Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-20033-21?cc=1831469&wc=10707221 : accessed 23
December 2012)
39. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1847, 140, Carel Mulder, 19 May 1847; digital images, Familysearch
(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-33066-75?cc=1831469&wc=10707218 : accessed 24 December 2012)
40. Dutch Reformed Church (Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands), “Doop Boek van de Gereformeerde kerke der stad Goes,
zijnde begonnen met den jare 1768 [Baptism book of the Reformed Church of the city Goes, being started in the year 1768]”,
unpaginated, Carel Mulder, 8 March 1780; digital images, Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013).
41. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Cornelis Mulder and Janneke de Zeeuw, 6 November 1829
42. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Pieter Steutel and Jacoba Johanna Mulder, 29 December 1831
43. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Johannes Mulder and Henderika Johanna Hogesteger, 10 May 1838
44. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849; “Strafinrichtingen [Prisons] Zeeland,” record group 254, call number 4;
Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg, Zeeland, Netherlands, p. 158-159v.
45. Governor of Zeeland, letter, to Regents of house of arrest of Goes, 20 December 1841; Relatieven serie ‘A’, Eerste
Afdeling [correspondence series A, first deparment], 16-31 December 1841, letter 12269; “Provinciaal Bestuur van Zeeland
[Provincial government of Zeeland] 1813-1850.” record group 6.1, call number 795; Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg,
Netherlands.
46. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849, p. 207v.
47. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849, p. 227v.
48. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 14 June 2013), database, entry for
“trouwgeld [marriage dues] Carel Mulder en Johanna Carnaay”, 22 April 1803
49. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1863, 72, Johanna Cornaaij, 26 May 1863; digital images,
Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-36032-73?cc=1831469&wc=10707220 : accessed 24
December 2012)

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My next fill-in-the-gaps couple is Grandma’s great-grandparents–my 3x greats, Karel Pieter Philippe Mulder and Johanna Maria Boes Mulder.

Here are the Ancestry-created bios:

When Karel Pieter Philippe Mulder was born on February 21, 1837, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, his father, Karel, was 24 and his mother, Rose, was 27. He married Johanna Maria Boes and they had six children together. He also had three sons and three daughters with Klazina Otte. He died on April 22, 1881, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 44.

When Johanna Maria Boes was born on July 8, 1835, in IJzendijke, Zeeland, Netherlands, her father, Izaak, was 30, and her mother, Adriana, was 26. She married Karel Pieter Philippe Mulder on November 7, 1861, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands. They had six children during their marriage. She died as a young mother on November 19, 1867, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 32.

Karel’s family had been in Goes and would continue in Goes, for the most part. But Johanna was born in a town about 30 miles away from Goes. She would marry, live, and die in Goes.

Such a sad story. After bearing six children, Johanna died at age 32. Her sixth child was stillborn about six weeks before Johanna herself passed. Also, a daughter born three years before had also passed away as an infant, only a few months old. The other four children, all boys, survived. One of them was my 2x great-grandfather Pieter Mulder who immigrated to the United States with his wife and first two children.

Karel himself was two years younger than Johanna, so when she died, he was a 30-year-olg widower with four children. Nine months later, he married Klazina Otte. He had six children with Klazina. I have written before about the situation with this family. Karel ended up being a prosperous merchant, but when he died at age 44 in 1881, Klazina was left with her own children, as well as the two youngest children of Johanna’s. Those two were sent to the orphanage in Goes. I wrote about it here: Pieter the Orphan. In that post I wrote how Karel owned the store with family members, and I don’t know how that affected things financially when he passed. Perhaps Klazina couldn’t care for that many children physically. Perhaps she couldn’t afford to. I wondered if the family had been “severed” from the boys being sent to an orphanage, but then I was contacted by family in the Netherlands who shared with me a letter from Pieter to his half-brother Jan: The Treasure that Arrived in an Email. Then I could see that the siblings kept in touch. That was wonderful news.

So what do I have about Karel and Johanna and what am I missing?

For Karel, I have his birth and death records. I also have his marriage records for Joanna. I have information from Yvette Hoitink about Karel’s business and real estate ownership. In working on this fill-in-the-gap project I dug up a marriage record for Karel and Klazina.

For Johanna, I have her birth, marriage, and death records.

I found a painting to represent Johanna on Ancestry. This painting is of a woman from the same town Johanna was, painted by Jan Haak. Maybe this is how she looked when she got married, before she had six children.

Yvette Hoitink was able to find some information about Karel’s military history–namely, there is none. That is because he was actually too short to be taken for the military.

 

KAREL PIETER P. MULDER

  1. 21 February 1837, Goes m. 7 November 1861, Goes

Karel Pieter Mulder married in Goes in 1861, so his marriage supplements did not survive. Goes enlistment records were ordered. He married at age 24, so could have fulfilled his military before marriage.

Karel Mulder in militia registration, 1856 Source: Goes, lists of men registered for the National Militia, levies 1851-1862, 1856 no. 27, Karel Mulder; call no. 1438, archives of the city of Goes, 1851-1919, Goes Municipal Archives, Goes; scans provided by Goes Municipal Archives.

2

Abstract:

No. 27, lot no. 77

Karel Mulder, born Goes 21 February 1837. Physical description: 1.495 m, broad face and forehead, blue eyes, pointy nose, ordinary mouth, round chin, bond hair and eyebrows, no noticeable marks. Son of Karel [Mulder] and Rose Melanie Bataille. Occupation: apothecary’s hand, father: shoemaker Informant: himself.

This shows the name as Karel Mulder, not Karel Pieter P. Mulder. Karel Mulder is the name found in previous phases. The birth date and parents match the information previously found, proving this is the correct person.

Karel Mulder in militia enlistment, 1856 Source: Goes, lists of men registered for the National Militia, levies 1854-1862, 1856 no. 29, Karel Mulder; call no. 1484, archives of the city of Goes, 1851-1919, Goes Municipal Archives, Goes; scans provided by Goes Municipal Archives.

Abstract:

No. 29, Karel Mulder. Born Goes 22 February 1837. Height: 1.495 m Son of Karel [mulder] and Rosie Melanie Bataille Occupation: apothecary’s hand, father shoemaker Informant: himself

Lot number 77

Undersized, one year delay.

This shows that Karel Mulder was too short to have to serve in the military. He got a one year delay to see if he would grow. Unfortunately, the Goes archives did not check the register for the next year to see if he made the mark that year.

Later from Yvette by email:

The Goes archivist had to be in the archives and checked the following years of militia enlistment registers, but Karel Mulder does not appear in the later years. It appears he never served in the military on account of being too short.

It looks like Karel never got tall enough for the military. Maybe he was happy about that, maybe not.

So how short was he? I believe he was about 4’9. I do think that a line of short men came from this branch. His grandson, my great-grandfather, was not a tall man, although definitely taller than 4’9. After that the men were taller as my great-grandmother was tall.

The gaps I have for Karel and Johanna will probably always be places where I have to insert my imagination. I have all the main pertinent documents relating to their lives.

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My next fill-in-the-gaps couple is Grandma’s great-grandparents–my 3x greats, Jan Gorsse and Kornelia Heijman Gorsse.

Here are the Ancestry-created bios:

Jan Gorsse was born on October 29, 1840, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, the son of Neeltje and Willem. He married Kornelia Heijman on September 4, 1862, in his hometown. They had two children during their marriage. He died on April 25, 1911, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 70.

When Kornelia Heijman was born on February 1, 1840, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, her father, Willem, was 27, and her mother, Pieternella, was 27. She married Jan Gorsse on September 4, 1862, in her hometown. They had two children during their marriage. She died on December 20, 1909, in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands, at the age of 69.

Notice that the bios state that the couple had two children. That is all I know about right now. It is possible that there were more. Since I am so focused this year on my direct ancestors I am not putting the time into searching laterally right now. The two children I know about are my great-great grandmother Neeltje Gorsse Mulder and her sister Wilhelmina. Because Neeltje wasn’t born until almost seven years after the couple married and then her sister two years later, it is possible that the couple did have other children before Neeltje–children that either lived or died in infancy.

I read over that paragraph and thought: why not do a quick wiewas wie search. Just for a few minutes. Guess what I discovered? Three children of Jan and Kornelia who all died in February 1879: 5-year-old Gerard, 3-year-old Jan, and 15-month-old Hendrica. So I did some conjecturing. These children were younger than Neeltje and Wilhelmina, thus more vulnerable. One of Neeltje’s descendants believed that the tuberculosis that killed her was something that she brought with her from the Netherlands. Could her younger siblings have died from it?

I am guessing that Neeltje named her sons Jan and Henry after her deceased siblings, but it is possible she only used the names for her father and another family member. Here are the death records.


 

 


 

Keep in mind that I need to do a more exhaustive search in the future. I need to look for the birth records for these children, as well as seeing if there were other children in the family.

For both Jan and Kornelia I am lucky enough to have birth, marriage, and death records. Maybe it helps that they both were born, lived, and died in Goes–all in one city.

From Yvette, I obtained Jan’s military record. Here is a summation:

  1. 29 October 1840, Goes m. 4 September 1862, Goes

Jan married in a period where marriage supplements do not survive. He married at 22, so either he did not have to serve, or got permission from his commanding officer. Enlistment records in Goes were checked.

Jan Gorsse in militia registration, 1859 Source: Goes, lists of men registered for the National Militia, levies 1851-1862, 1859 no. 21, Jan Gorsse; call no. 1438, archives of the city of Goes, 1851-1919, Goes Municipal Archives, Goes; scans provided by Goes Municipal Archives.

Abstract:

Jan Gorsse, born Goes 24 October 1840 Physical description: 1.683m, oval face, narrow forehead, blue eyes, ordinary nose and mouth, round chin, blond hair and eyebrows, no noticeable marks. Son of Willem [Gorsse] and Neeltje Reijerse. Occupation: laborer, father broom maker. Informant: himself.

This record gives Jan’s name as Jan Gorsse, not Gorsee and has a slightly different birth date than the date provided by Luanne Castle. The original birth record showed the name as Jan Gorse, born 29 October 1840. The birth record named the parents as broom maker Willem Gorse and Neeltje Reijerse.1 This information perfectly matches the information in the militia registration, proving this is the correct record.

1 Civil Registration (Goes), birth record 1840 no. 184, Jan Gorse (29 October 1840); “Zeeuwen Gezocht,” index and images, Zeeuws Archief (http://www.zeeuwsarchief.nl : accessed 13 March 2020).

Jan Gorsse in militia enlistment, 1859 Source: Goes, lists of men registered for the National Militia, levies 1854-1862, 1859 no. 17, Jan Gorsse; call no. 1484, archives of the city of Goes, 1851-1919, Goes Municipal Archives, Goes; scans provided by Goes Municipal Archives.

Abstract:

No. 17.

Jan Gorsse, born Goes 29 October 1840, height 1.683, son of Willem [Gorsse] and Neeltje Reijerse. Occupation: laborer, father: broom maker. Informant: Himself

Assigned lot number 61.

Designated for duty.

Entered into service in the place of Petrus Arnoldus Franken, levy 1858, deceased. 2nd regiment infantry. Passport 1 March 1863 muster roll no. 48491.

This record has the correct birth date of 29 October 1840.

This shows that he was initially not supposed to serve, but entered in the military to make up the numbers because another man in his levy passed away.

Military record of Jan Gorsse Source: 2nd Regiment Infantry (Netherlands), muster roll of petty officers and men, 1859-1860, no. 48491, Adriaan Zuijdweg; digital film 008341183, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSTP-QWV9-4 : accessed 10 March 2020).

Abstract:

No. 48491.

Jan Gorsse Son of Willem [Gorsse] and Neeltje Reijerse Born Goes 29 October 1840, last residence Goes

Physical description at arrival: 1.709 m, oval face, narrow forehead, blue eyes, ordinary nose and mouth, round chin, blond hair and eyebrows, no noticeable marks.

Service: On 14 May 1859 assigned as soldier for the time of four years as a conscript of the levy of 1859 from Zeeland, Goes no. 61. Replaces the deceased soldier Franken, Petrus Arnoldus of the levy of 1858 see no. 25 regiment grenadiers and hunters. reserve On 17 April 1860 inactive On 15 July 1861 on grand leave

Promotions [blank] Campaigns [blank]

End of service: 1 March 1863 received passport of for expiration of military service.

This confirms he served in the place of someone else. He served for four years, including two years of training and two years of grand leave. He got out of the army on 1 March 1863.

Let me sum up the summation (haha). At first Jan (pronounced Yahn) did not have to serve (he won the lottery so to speak), but then he had to take the place of someone who had passed away in order to keep up the numbers for his area. He ended up serving for four years, being discharged on 1 March 1863, which is a half year after he and Kornelia married.

Something I have started to notice from the descriptions that I have been provided for the men on my maternal side. I haven’t found one yet that wasn’t a blue-eyed blond. When I was little, I remember my father telling me about how blue eyes were a recessive gene, which of course went way over my head. What I took away was that he was surprised that I had blue eyes since he had brown eyes and my mother blue. But at least one of Dad’s grandparents was blue-eyed (his mom’s mother) and it looks like my mother’s family was awash in blue eyes, so I guess it makes sense that my eyes turned out blue. Of course, I still don’t understand recessive and dominant genes!

This is a windmill in the hometown of Jan and Kornelia, Goes in Zeeland, built in 1801. it’s called De Korenbloem.

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My next fill-in-the-gaps couple is Grandpa’s 4th and final set of great-grandparents–my 3x greats, Lukas Bomhof and Jeuntien Dansser Bomhof.

Here are the Ancestry-created bios:

When Lukas Bomhof was born on December 9, 1788, in Windesheim, Overijssel, Netherlands, his father, Albert, was 32 and his mother, Zwaantje, was 31. He married Jeuntien Dansser on October 13, 1825, in Zwolle, Overijssel, Netherlands. At that time, Lukas was a kastelein (inkeeper) in Zwolle. On 5 March 1838, Lukas was a shoemaker in Zwolle. They had five children in 10 years. He died on September 16, 1847, in Zwolle, Overijssel, Netherlands, at the age of 58.

Jeuntien Dansser was born on April 26, 1806, in Zwolle, Overijssel, Netherlands, the daughter of Maria and Johannes. She married Lukas Bomhof on October 13, 1825, in her hometown. They had five children in 10 years. She died on January 31, 1842, at the age of 35.

Let’s take that apart. Lukas was born 200 years before my daughter!!! He was 18 years older than Jeuntien. There might be a reason for that delay in his marriage, so hold on to that thought. When the couple married, Jeuntien was 19 years old, but Lukas was 37. From the ages of 23 and 33, Jeuntien, who I believe was also called Johanna, gave birth to five children. All these children survived to adulthood. One of them was my great-great-grandmother who immigrated to the U.S. in middle age and lived far longer than any of her siblings.

Two years after the birth of her children, Johanna died at age 35. Very sad, but a story that is just too familiar in family history.

Keep in mind that this is my fourth 3x great grandmother named Johanna!

So where was Lukas before he met Johanna? And what documents am I missing from their lives?

I do have the marriage record and supplements. What are marriage supplements? According to Yvette Hoitink’s website:

Since the introduction of the civil registration in 1811, a bride and groom had to submit several documents to prove they were eligible to get married. Not only do these records tell you when your ancestors were born, but they may also provide information about their physical appearance, death dates of parents and previous spouses or even of their grandparents.  These documents are known as the ‘Huwelijksbijlagen‘ and most of them still exist and can be found online.

Read more about these supplements here.

I have the index for Johanna’s death, although I have not gained access to the death record itself.

I also have the index record, but not the death record for Lukas’ death:

I do not have birth records for either Lukas or Johanna, although I have the basic information of dates and places.

So I really need both death and birth records. Lukas was born with the surname Nijentap, but in 1812, his father Albert changed the family name, which included the surnames of his three adult sons, Lukas and his brothers. So his birth/baptism records will be under the name Nijentap.

What I do have for Lukas, though, is pretty cool. Yvette found his military records. I am copying the summation from Yvette, followed by the records themselves.

You will see that Lukas, a musketeer under the command of the Duke of Wellington, helped to defeat Napoleon, most likely at Waterloo. He served in the army from 1814-1817. He was 26-29 years old.

LUKAS BOMHOF b. 9 December 1788, Windesheim m. 13 October 1825, Zwolle  His marriage supplements do not include proof of military service.3 Since he would have reached the age of 19 in 1807, during the French occupation, he would not have been required to show proof of service.

A Lucas Bomhof, sergeant, is on a list of Waterloo gratifications: Lucas Bomhof as recipient of Waterloo gratification Source: Foundation of the encouragement and support of servicemen in the Netherlands, gratifications, 1817-1817, vol. F, infantry National Militia, entry 1956, Lucas Bomhof; call no. 718, Foundation of the encouragement and support of servicemen in the Netherlands, record group 355, consulted “Indexen,” index and images, Gemeente Amsterdam Stadsarchief (https://archief.amsterdam/indexen/deeds/fc874cd5-df5a-4a2f-b7d894f8533f4f95?person=95a7409f-829b-4a53-e053-b784100ad337 : accessed 10 March 2020).  Abstract: Batallion Infantry National Militia no. 4 Sergeant, no. 1956 Lucas Bomhof, received 461 francs, 20 centimes – 217 guilders and 92.5 cents. Paid 27 September 1817 to council of Amsterdam. Military record of Lucas Bomhoff Source: Batallion Infantry National Militia no. 4,muster rolls, Lucas Bomhof, no. 2469; imaged as film 008341006, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSTP-97RH-C : accessed 10 March 2020). Abstract: No. 2469 (corrected from 493): Lucas Bomhof Father: Albert Bomhof Mother: Swintein Jansen Born Winsen, 14 December 1788 Last residence: Zwolle Physical description: 5’ 4”, round face, round forehead, blue eyes, wide nose, ordinary mouth, round chin, blond hair and eyebrows, poxy complexion. Where and how arrived in the batallion:  Called to the land militia in 1814 from the militia district Overijssel from the region Zwolle, municipality Zwolle. During the lottery drew lot no. 810. Arrived in service as “fusilier” [musketeer]  on 26 April 1814. Where served previously: [blank]

This shows he served in the Dutch army from 26 April 1814 to May 1817.  This was the time when the Dutch army was fighting Napoleon. The gratification was given to all soldiers who were under command of the Duke of Wellington during the battles of 15 to 18 June 1815, who were involved with blockades and sieges in France, or who joined the allied army in France prior to 7 July 1815.4  The 4th battalion had an important role during the battle of Waterloo. The battalion, under command of captain Van Hemert, flanked the French cavalry to halt their advance.5 Given the regulations for the gratification and the known actions by the battalion he was a member of, it seems most likely that Lucas Bomhof was indeed at the battle of Waterloo. If he was not at Waterloo, he at least contributed to Napoleon’s defeat.

No Lucas Bomhof found in (partial) indexes of military records in French period at Nationaal Archief website.6 He was not found in the database of Dutch soldiers who were part of the army of Napoleon.7

 

4 “Waterloogratificaties 1815,” Gemeente Amsterdam Stadsarchief (https://archief.amsterdam/uitleg/indexen/17waterloogratificaties : accessed 13 May 2020).  5 Marc Geerdink-Schaftenaar, “De Waterloo Campagne,” PDF, Grenadier Compagnie (http://www.grenadiercompagnie.nl/Bestanden/2.9%20Waterloo.pdf : accessed 13 March 2020).  6 “Indexen,” indexes, Nationaal Archief (https://www.nationaalarchief.nl/onderzoeken/zoeken?activeTab=nt_legacy : accessed 10 March 2020).  7 “Nederlandse militairen in het leger van Napoleon,” index, Ministerie van Defensie (https://www.archieven.nl : accessed 10 March 2020).

Soldier

 

3 Civil Registration (Zwolle), marriage supplements 1825 no. 75, Bomhof-Dansser (13 October 1825); “Netherlands, Overijssel Province, Civil Registration,, 1811-1960,” browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:939J-99YY-P : accessed 10 March 2020).

 

 

 

 

Yvette found this image for me.

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My next fill-in-the-gaps couple is one that merged the Mulder and the Zuijdweg families—and the reason my grandparents, a Mulder and a Zuidweg, were distant cousins because it grafted the Zuijdwegs onto the Mulder tree. Note: even in the Netherlands, the surname is sometimes spelled Zuijdweg and sometimes Zuidweg.

Adriaan Zuijdweg was born in 3 February 1805 in Goes, Netherlands. Adriaan was a tailor, so I found this image online to represent him. Unfortunately, I can’t locate anyone to credit for it, but would love to do so.

Apparently this seated position was common to tailors.

Johanna Mulder was born 10 March 1807, also in Goes. She was baptized on 29 March. The couple married 5 May 1836. Johanna worked as a maid at the time of the marriage.

In 1846, facing economic and religious pressures, Adriaan applied for the town of Goes to pay for he and his family to emigrate to the US, but he must have been denied. I suspect he was part of the separatist movement within the Reformed Church and wanted to join the group in Zeeland, Michigan. He must have been very disappointed that he couldn’t emigrate. You can read about the documentation for this on the old post: My Dutch Family Almost Arrived in the U.S. Decades Earlier.

Five years later, on 2 April 1951, he was dead at the age of 46.

The couple had six children. One of them was my 2x great-grandfather, Johannes Zuijdweg.

The youngest child, Willem, was a baby when his father died. Life must have been hard for Johanna after that. The economy in Goes at the time was not good and now she had six children, even a baby, to support by herself.

Many years later, Willem immigrated to Michigan in 1889 with his wife and two sons (a baby girl died in the Netherlands). The older brother, Adrian, was named for his grandfather, as was my great-grandfather. He lived in Cascade in Kent County.  The younger brother, James William, changed his surname to Southway which is what Zuijdweg means. He lived in Detroit. Willem and his family were the first Zuijdwegs to live in the United States. Willem managed to fulfill his father’s dream of living in the United States. Willem’s brother Johannes, my great-great-grandfather, did not immigrate until he was much older–he followed his own son to the U.S.

On 11 June 1878, Johanna passed away at the age of 71. There is documentation that she was working as a “laborer” when she was in her early sixties. I suppose it’s possible she worked until she died.

I have the marriage and death records for both husband and wife. I also have the documention of Adriaan’s denied request to leave the Netherlands. I was able to get Adriaan’s military records from Yvette Hoitink.

According to Yvette’s research Adriaan did not serve in the military. Here is the military record (part of it):



I am missing both birth records for Johanna and Adriaan. And I sure wish I had photos, but considering that they were born in 1805 and 1807, I suppose that hope is unrealistic!

In general, now that I am back with an early generation in the Netherlands, this is what I can look for:

  • birth record
  • marriage record (including if there was more than one marriage)
  • death record

These are what I can generally find, but not always, through Wiewaswie and other online sources. Yvette was able to search military records for me. And sometimes I have been blessed with information from Dutch cousins and readers, such as newspaper information. Because I can’t read Dutch if I want a less haphazard method of obtaining newspaper articles, I would need to hire a genealogist, such as Yvette, to search. Yvette’s expertise means that she knows how to find certain information that is not readily available–and where there are gaps of records because of fire, etc.

I had been frustrated that I have not been able to find birth records for Adriaan and Johanna as of yet.  BUT maybe that was because I should have been looking for baptismal records instead! When I searched for those, I found Johanna’s baptismal record dated 29 March 1807. Her religion at birth was “Low German Reformed,” which simply means Dutch Reformed. “High German” is Lutheran. I had to order this record for a cost, but it got to me yesterday, in time for this post. Here is the cropped page for 1807. Johanna is at the bottom of the image.

1 – Zeeuws Archief

Maybe one day I will find Adriaan’s birth or baptismal record. I wonder if there is a spelling discrepancy either on the record itself or in the indexing.

 

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On my Ancestry DNA account I probably have more matches to this branch of the family than any other. The Mulders were also the extended family we shared holidays and visits with more than the rest. They were my mom’s aunts, uncles, and cousins. The oldest person I knew in that branch was my great-grandfather, Charles Mulder.

Peter (Pieter) and Nellie (Neeltje) were his parents, and they immigrated from Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands when Charles, their first born, was just a toddler. He had a baby brother Jan who did not survive to grow up in the United States. After moving here, they had more children.

Here are a couple posts about this couple:

Pieter the Orphan Peter was sent to the orphanage.

Mulders Everywhere This post has a lot of photos of Nellie and Peter

The Treasure that Arrived in an Email This letter was written by Peter after Nellie passed away

When I went to organize what I had on Peter and Nellie, it was pretty easy because I already had so much information. What I do not have is Peter’s obituary, and I will order it when offices open back up. They are currently closed because of the pandemic. I do have Nellie’s meager obituary. I apologize that it appears blurry. That is the best that can be done with this article from 1932. It gives the list of those that survive her, her address, about the funeral and viewing. It also mentions she was 64-years-old.

From Nellie’s death certificate, we know she died of “pulmonary TB.” Her granddaughter Mary, one of Henry’s (Charles’ brother) daughters, recalled that her grandmother was sickly.  She thinks she was even sick when she came to the US from the Netherlands.  It is possible that she had TB when she emigrated to the US, and if so, very likely that she exposed/infected her family members with TB.  (info from cousin Merry)

Amberly worked on the immigration and naturalization of Peter and Nellie, but I already knew the couple had arrived on the Zaandam on 29 August 1887. There is one more piece of information we need, but I cannot order it until the archives open back up.

I also needed military information on Peter, which I did get from Yvette:

So Peter did not serve in the military. He was able to marry at age 19 and immigrate to the United States at age 21. This would not have happened if he had had to serve.

I’ve been blessed with a lot of information on Peter and Nellie. I also wrote about them in my chapbook Kin Types, imagining them as a young courting couple.

 

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Last maternal great-grandparent: Charles Mulder of Caledonia, Michigan. He was the only great-grandparent I knew–and I adored him.

Luanne and her great-grandfather Charles Mulder

Charles was born Karel Pieter Phillipus Mulder on 6 March 1885 in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands. On my Ancestry page for Charles, I had posted a link to his birth record, but had not downloaded it. I now downloaded it, added it to his Ancestry page, and put it into a folder for all of his documents.

Amberly is helping me with his naturalization info. I do have a ship record (the Zandaam), so I know two-year-old Charles arrived in the U.S. with his parents and his brother Jan, a baby of one. Jan died very soon after the family immigrated.

In fact, I made the Charles folder because I had not yet done so. To that folder, I added his marriage record, death record, and all the census records that feature Charles: 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940. I also downloaded and added his military registrations for both WWI and WWII.

I was surprised to see that Charles had a social security number. For the sake of dotting all the Is and all that, I ordered  his application.

Charles and his wife Clara share a headstone, and I have that photograph. I added it to Ancestry and to the new folder.

I found that I had a copy of Charles’ obituary, so I added it to Ancestry and to the folder on my computer.

Reading over my great-grandfather’s obituary I was shocked to see he only lived to be 82 years old. I was about 12 when he passed away, and I remember feeling frustrated that I was not allowed to attend his funeral since I adored him. But I thought he was about  a zillion years old. No, he was elderly, but only 82. That doesn’t even seem old to me today.

Once again, I had sponsored my great-grandfather’s page on Findagrave, but am not managing it. I have submitted a request to transfer management to me, but I suspect as with the others I have mentioned before, that I have asked in the past and been ignored. We will see what happens.

 

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I’ll be taking a little blog break for a couple of weeks. Hope all is well with you and yours. I also hope that when I begin the search for gaps in my great-greats I don’t get too discouraged!

 

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Both my maternal great-grandmothers were born in the United States, but their husbands, my great-grandfathers, were immigrants. First I will discuss my maternal grandmother’s mother, Clara Waldeck Mulder.

I lack a birth record for Clara. Michigan did not insist on birth records for many years, so my inability to find anything about her birth could be a victim of that bureaucratic lapse. Because I don’t have a birth record I do not know for sure if she even had a middle name. Her death record says NONE for middle name.

Clara’s married name, Clara Mulder, is extremely common in Michigan. Mulder is a Dutch name akin to the English Miller. Her parents and all siblings were Prussian immigrants, but she took on her husband’s Dutch name when she got married.

I’ve posted quite a bit about Clara. You can read more about Clara at My Great-Grandmother’s Lifetime of Service.

Clara was a farm wife, which is a sort of business person, and so she did not have a job which earns a salary. Since Social Security was instituted in 1935, when she was 51, she might have gotten a social security number if she had needed it for work. I do not believe she ever got her social security number. That is unfortunate because she might have applied with her place of birth (the town) and a middle name.

I already have her death certificate, which I have posted in the past, and census reports for 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940. There is no 1890 census, so my records for the census are complete for Clara. I did sponsor Clara’s page at Findagrave, but I do not manage the profile, as I do for Grandma and Grandpa. I also have Clara’s obituary (see the link above for the obit) and her headstone, which she shares with her husband–but I did not have these items loaded to my Ancestry account. I remedied that problem.

While I would love to find more information on Clara, I really could not add anything at this point, so I decided to request to manage Clara’s profile on Findagrave as my weekly task.

Clara is the third ancestor whose records I have combed for gaps, and I have updated my Ancestry records. However, I still have not transferred these records to another tree OR cleaned up my computer files for these individuals. Going to take the opportunity of a light job here to go do that! Hope the rest of your week goes very well!

Clara and Charles Mulder

50th wedding anniversary

 

 

 

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