Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Kalamazoo Public Library’

I was doing a little research for a post I want to write about my grandfather when I discovered this link to a historical photography project in Kalamazoo.

Students are taking old photos from the Kalamazoo Public Library collection and photographing the same scene from the same angle. Very interesting. It’s still a work in progress, and I can’t wait to see more.

Check it out here: KALAMAZOO THEN & NOW

Although I am so disappointed that Western Michigan University’s old campus was allowed to be destroyed for the most part, I do think Kalamazoo has a strong voice for history–in part because of the university and an active library and in part because so many people love Kalamazoo.

How about your community? How does it take care of its history?

downtown Kalamazoo, photo by Joseph DeKorn

 

Read Full Post »

Actually the house was right in the middle of the city, not in the woods, but that sounds nice–very Ingalls-Wilder-ish.

A while back I posted a photo of a house with Alice Leeuwenhoek standing in front of it on Thanksgiving 1907. The address on the back was 126 Balch Street, which didn’t seem to conform to current addresses. I asked a lot of questions about it. Uncle Don explained that were some buildings behind the houses on the street.

 

126 Balch Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan

Then I heard from Jill-O, a librarian in Kalamazoo. (P.S. You will love her blog so go check it out!)

Here are the results of her research in a 1908 insurance street map of Kalamazoo:

Jill-O says:

It looks like the numbers are in the same location as today. There are a couple of outbuildings behind 126, so either the house was torn down and rebuilt, or the one of the outbuildings was used.

Here is the house that  is on the street, numbered 126, today.

Let’s look at the pic and think back to 1907. In the photo you can see an outbuilding behind the house, so it’s unlikely that it’s off the street, behind another building. But if it was 126, wouldn’t the outbuilding be poking out on the other side? And wouldn’t the house be larger? As to the second question, maybe not. The house shows one room and behind it another room, so maybe from the photo we can’t see the depth of the house. As to the first question, what if the photo is reversed? I don’t know too much about the process of taking photos or developing them in those days, and maybe the photo is reversed.

OR. What if this is an outbuilding and that building off to the left is a house on the street from another angle?

The more answers I find, the more questions I have. I think my husband is right: I ask way too many questions.

This map is invaluable to me because so many of my relatives lived in this neighborhood. I am going to use it to plug in the addresses on the census reports–yippee!!!

Thank you, Jill-O!

Read Full Post »

I’ve been chatting on about Kalamazoo, Michigan, for some months now, but if you don’t know the city or the area, you probably only know what I’ve been able to post.

If you would like to see more of historical Kalamazoo, here are some links:

Kalamazoo Public Library

The library has links to many collections, including one which displays this photo of 310 E. Michigan Avenue in 1893.

Vanished from Kalamazoo, County

This site allows people to send in photos of businesses and other places in Kalamazoo which have vanished from the landscape.  Here is a photo which was sent in by my brother of the family business.  At the time of this photo my father Rudy Hanson owned both the luggage store and Why Shoe Works located next door (you can see a bit of the sign).

The History of Kalamazoo, MI

This site provides history, but no photos.

Michigan Genealogy

At this site you will find photos such as the one below of the Upjohn Company, a very important part of Kalamazoo for decades, in 1933.

Portage District Library

This site is good for history and photos of Portage.

Read Full Post »