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Posts Tagged ‘history of Zeeland’

Did you catch that in the title? Carel and Johanna are both my 4x great-grandparents and my 5x great-grandparents!

How is that possible? Through my maternal grandfather, Carel and Johanna are my 4X greats, the parents of Johanna Mulder who married Adriaan Zuijdweg, the tailor. Through my maternal grandmother, Carel and Johanna are my 5x greats, as they were also the parents of Karel Mulder and Rose Melanie Bataille who I haven’t even scanned for gaps yet since they are 4X and I only just started working on 4X!

I have not found a baptism or birth record for Johanna, but believe she was born around 1782 (based on her death record) and probably in Middelburg, which is the capital city of Zeeland. Carel was baptized in Goes on 8 March 1780. Here is the record.

1 – Zeeuws Archief

I have an index for the marriage of Carel and Johanna in April 1803, but not a copy of the record itself. They were married in Middelburg. I do not know what brought Carel to Middelburg to meet Johanna. By 1812 he was a shopkeeper in Goes.

I do have death records for both Carel and Johanna.

We happen to have a little more info about Carel than some of these other ancestors from this long-ago period as there are documents that give an idea of what was going on in his life.

After being a shopkeeper, Carel worked as a prison guard, or assistant of the jailor. In 1841, he got in trouble when he didn’t show proper submission to the jailor. He was suspended for four weeks without pay. I prefer to believe that his boss was a jerk and the suspension was unavoidable.

In 1846, Carel suffered from a debilitating illness that made it impossible for him to continue working. His son-in-law Pieter Steutel was allowed to substitute for him. Pieter was the husband of Carel and Johanna’s oldest child, Jacoba.

My many times removed cousin Elly Mulder provided me with two articles about Carel’s pension. The other information came to me from Yvette Hoitink (* see her research at the end of the post). I am sorry, but the articles are not translated. (A future project is to get translations of each document in my collection, but that will have to wait for now).

Carel Mulder was honorably discharged on 31 August 1846. After a lot of bureaucracy, he was awarded a pension by Royal Decree on 11 March 1847 (starting 1 September 1846). He died just two months after the final decision.

I would love to know more about the jail and what it was like in those days, 200 years ago. What did it look like? What was the job of a “jailer’s hand” like? Did it contribute to Carel’s illness?

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*Yvette’s research:

Carel Mulder37–39 was born about March 1780 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.40 He was baptized on 8 March 1780 in
Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.40 On 3 December 1812 he was a shopkeeper in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.20 On 6
November 1829 Carel was a jailor’s hand.41 On 29 December 1831 he was a jailor’s hand.42 On 5 May 1836 he was a jailor’s
hand in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.21,37 Carel witnessed the declaration of the birth of Karel Mulder on 21 February
1837 at C 129 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.8 On 21 February 1837 he was a jailor’s hand in Goes, Zeeland, the
Netherlands.8 On 10 May 1838 he was a jailor’s hand.43 On 12 December 1841 Carel was a prison guard at the house of
arrest in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.44–45 He insulted a jailor and did not show him the submission he was supposed to.
He was suspended by the governor of Zeeland for a period of four weeks without pay. On 5 June 1846 he was a prison
guard in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.46 He was too ill to do his job as a prison guard, so the regents of the prison that his
son-in-law Pieter Steutel could take over for him On 31 August 1846 he was discharged as a prison guard. On 11 March
1847, the King awarded Karel Mulder a pension of 104 guilders, starting 1 September 1846.47 Carel died on 19 May 1847 at
the age of 67 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.39 He was also known as Karel Mulder. Johanna Cornaaij and Carel Mulder were married on 22 April 1803 in Middelburg, Zeeland, the Netherlands.48

Johanna Cornaaij37–38 was born about 1782 in Middelburg, Zeeland, the Netherlands.49 She lived in Goes, Zeeland, the
Netherlands on 5 May 1836.21,37 She died on 26 May 1863 at the age of 81 in Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands.49

Endnotes from Yvette Hoitink:

37. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, marriage record, 1836, 15, Adriaan Zuidweg-Johanna Mulder, 5 May 1836; digital
images, Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11539-85068-10?cc=1831469&wc=10707155 :
accessed 23 December 2012)
38. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1878, 55, Johanna Mulder, 11 June 1878; digital images,
Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-20033-21?cc=1831469&wc=10707221 : accessed 23
December 2012)
39. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1847, 140, Carel Mulder, 19 May 1847; digital images, Familysearch
(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-33066-75?cc=1831469&wc=10707218 : accessed 24 December 2012)
40. Dutch Reformed Church (Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands), “Doop Boek van de Gereformeerde kerke der stad Goes,
zijnde begonnen met den jare 1768 [Baptism book of the Reformed Church of the city Goes, being started in the year 1768]”,
unpaginated, Carel Mulder, 8 March 1780; digital images, Familysearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 28 July 2013).
41. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Cornelis Mulder and Janneke de Zeeuw, 6 November 1829
42. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Pieter Steutel and Jacoba Johanna Mulder, 29 December 1831
43. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 28 July 2013), database, entry for
entry for marriage record of Johannes Mulder and Henderika Johanna Hogesteger, 10 May 1838
44. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849; “Strafinrichtingen [Prisons] Zeeland,” record group 254, call number 4;
Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg, Zeeland, Netherlands, p. 158-159v.
45. Governor of Zeeland, letter, to Regents of house of arrest of Goes, 20 December 1841; Relatieven serie ‘A’, Eerste
Afdeling [correspondence series A, first deparment], 16-31 December 1841, letter 12269; “Provinciaal Bestuur van Zeeland
[Provincial government of Zeeland] 1813-1850.” record group 6.1, call number 795; Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg,
Netherlands.
46. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849, p. 207v.
47. “Notulen van het Kollegie van Regenten over het Huis van Arrest te Goes [Minutes of the college of regents of the
house of apprehension in Goes],” 1839-1849, p. 227v.
48. Zeeuws Archief, Zeeuwen Gezocht (http://www.zeeuwengezocht.nl : accessed 14 June 2013), database, entry for
“trouwgeld [marriage dues] Carel Mulder en Johanna Carnaay”, 22 April 1803
49. Goes, Zeeland, the Netherlands, death record, 1863, 72, Johanna Cornaaij, 26 May 1863; digital images,
Familysearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11565-36032-73?cc=1831469&wc=10707220 : accessed 24
December 2012)

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My next fill-in-the-gaps couple is one that merged the Mulder and the Zuijdweg families—and the reason my grandparents, a Mulder and a Zuidweg, were distant cousins because it grafted the Zuijdwegs onto the Mulder tree. Note: even in the Netherlands, the surname is sometimes spelled Zuijdweg and sometimes Zuidweg.

Adriaan Zuijdweg was born in 3 February 1805 in Goes, Netherlands. Adriaan was a tailor, so I found this image online to represent him. Unfortunately, I can’t locate anyone to credit for it, but would love to do so.

Apparently this seated position was common to tailors.

Johanna Mulder was born 10 March 1807, also in Goes. She was baptized on 29 March. The couple married 5 May 1836. Johanna worked as a maid at the time of the marriage.

In 1846, facing economic and religious pressures, Adriaan applied for the town of Goes to pay for he and his family to emigrate to the US, but he must have been denied. I suspect he was part of the separatist movement within the Reformed Church and wanted to join the group in Zeeland, Michigan. He must have been very disappointed that he couldn’t emigrate. You can read about the documentation for this on the old post: My Dutch Family Almost Arrived in the U.S. Decades Earlier.

Five years later, on 2 April 1951, he was dead at the age of 46.

The couple had six children. One of them was my 2x great-grandfather, Johannes Zuijdweg.

The youngest child, Willem, was a baby when his father died. Life must have been hard for Johanna after that. The economy in Goes at the time was not good and now she had six children, even a baby, to support by herself.

Many years later, Willem immigrated to Michigan in 1889 with his wife and two sons (a baby girl died in the Netherlands). The older brother, Adrian, was named for his grandfather, as was my great-grandfather. He lived in Cascade in Kent County.  The younger brother, James William, changed his surname to Southway which is what Zuijdweg means. He lived in Detroit. Willem and his family were the first Zuijdwegs to live in the United States. Willem managed to fulfill his father’s dream of living in the United States. Willem’s brother Johannes, my great-great-grandfather, did not immigrate until he was much older–he followed his own son to the U.S.

On 11 June 1878, Johanna passed away at the age of 71. There is documentation that she was working as a “laborer” when she was in her early sixties. I suppose it’s possible she worked until she died.

I have the marriage and death records for both husband and wife. I also have the documention of Adriaan’s denied request to leave the Netherlands. I was able to get Adriaan’s military records from Yvette Hoitink.

According to Yvette’s research Adriaan did not serve in the military. Here is the military record (part of it):



I am missing both birth records for Johanna and Adriaan. And I sure wish I had photos, but considering that they were born in 1805 and 1807, I suppose that hope is unrealistic!

In general, now that I am back with an early generation in the Netherlands, this is what I can look for:

  • birth record
  • marriage record (including if there was more than one marriage)
  • death record

These are what I can generally find, but not always, through Wiewaswie and other online sources. Yvette was able to search military records for me. And sometimes I have been blessed with information from Dutch cousins and readers, such as newspaper information. Because I can’t read Dutch if I want a less haphazard method of obtaining newspaper articles, I would need to hire a genealogist, such as Yvette, to search. Yvette’s expertise means that she knows how to find certain information that is not readily available–and where there are gaps of records because of fire, etc.

I had been frustrated that I have not been able to find birth records for Adriaan and Johanna as of yet.  BUT maybe that was because I should have been looking for baptismal records instead! When I searched for those, I found Johanna’s baptismal record dated 29 March 1807. Her religion at birth was “Low German Reformed,” which simply means Dutch Reformed. “High German” is Lutheran. I had to order this record for a cost, but it got to me yesterday, in time for this post. Here is the cropped page for 1807. Johanna is at the bottom of the image.

1 – Zeeuws Archief

Maybe one day I will find Adriaan’s birth or baptismal record. I wonder if there is a spelling discrepancy either on the record itself or in the indexing.

 

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Last week I wrote about the Remijnse (Remine) family from the beginning (of our current knowledge). There is a huge pedigree chart available online, and while I need to take it all with a grain of salt, it is extremely useful. It prints out to exactly 248 pages!

My new chum Jacob Remijnse decided to try to figure out the identity of the people in the unidentified Remijnse family photo, using the pedigree chart.

The photograph seems to have been taken upon the occasion of a wedding–the bride is in the white dress in the center and the groom is to her left (our right). The other seated man is probably the father. Let’s assume the five standing behind are siblings.

The only thing I know about this photo is that my family believes it is of one of the Remijnse branches. I figured out it has to be from the Netherlands because it doesn’t fit the Remijnse family members who came to this country.

Using the clothing as a guide, especially the styles of the dresses and the women’s hats, I think the photo was taken somewhere between the late 1870s and 1890. Jacob came to that independent analysis, as well.

Then he drew up a chart of the Remijnse family with dates of birth, dates of death, dates of marriage, and names of spouses. He made columns for how old each person was in 1865, 1875, and 1885. This was extremely helpful.

Using this analysis, it seemed likely that the young couple was one of two choices.

Jan Remijnse 29-05-1863 01-05-1900 2 12 22
07-08-1885
Cornelia Bijlo 06-03-1863 01-04-1942 2 12 22

Jan was 22 in 1885 when he married 22-year-old Cornelia Biljo. There is no doubt that this couple looks 22 or so.

OR

Dina Remijnse 17-02-1856 09-01-1943 9 19 29
07-05-1886
Francois Bijlo 09-08-1864 09-09-1942 1 11 21

Dina was 29 when she married Francois Biljo in 1886. Francois was 21.

Doesn’t Dina seem a better candidate for the standing woman in the back? She would have been 29 here and married the following year at age 30.

So what was the next step?

We needed to look at the family groups. Were Jan and Dina siblings? Was their mother deceased by 1885 since there is no mother in the photograph?  Were Cornelia and Francois siblings? The last is purely curiosity because I think this photo is a Remijnse family photo with the new spouse included. I don’t think it is a combination of members of the Remijnse and Biljo families.

Here is info on Dina Remijnse:

Dina Remijnse, born Sunday 17 February1856 in Kapelle. Notes at birth: Witnesses Pieter Staal and Jan Loijs. Dina died on Saturday, January 9th1943 in Kapelle, 86 years old. Note Dina: Religion Dutch Reformed. Profession housewife. Dina married, 30 years old, Friday 7 May1886 inKapelle [source: huw.akte nr. 13 BS Kapelle] with Francois Bijlo , 21 years old, born Tuesday 9 August1864 in Kapelle as son of Willem Bijlo and Maria van de Linde. Francois died on Wednesday 9 September1942 inKapelle, 78 years old. At the marriage ceremony the following witness was present: Nicolaas Remijnse (ca.1858 – 1909).

Notes on marriage: Witnesses Leendert Monter, 50 yr. Anton Leijs, 32 yr. Worker, Cornelis Markusse, 42 yr. Innkeeper.

Here is info on Jan Remijnse:

Jan Remijnse, born Friday 29 May1863 in Kapelle [source: certificate no. 34 BS Kapelle].

Notes at birth: Witnesses Thomas Snoep, 22 yr. Quartermaster and master, Johannes Staal, 29 yr., Tailor. Jan died Tuesday, May 11900 in Kapelle, 36   years old. The following witness was present at the death report: Nicolaas Remijnse (ca.1858 – 1909). Note on the death of Jan: Witnesses Willem Bijlo, 75 years of field worker, father-in-law. Profession: Field worker Religion: Free Evangelical. Jan married at the age of 22 on Friday 7 August 1885 inKapelle with Cornelia Bijlo, 22 years old, born on Friday 6 March1863 inKapelle as a daughter from Willem Bijlo and Maria van de Linde. Notes on the birth of Cornelia: Witnesses Pieter Snoep, 58 yr., Laborer, Nicolaas Mieras, 40 yr., Laborer. Cornelia died on Wednesday 1 April1942 in Goes, 79   years old [source: deed no. 75 BS Goes]. Note on death Cornelia: Witnesses Cornelis Sleutel, 55 yr., Caregiver. Note Cornelia: Religious Affection Dutch Reformed. At the wedding ceremony the following witness was present: Nicolaas Remijnse (ca.1858 – 1909). Notes on marriage: Witnesses Pieter Hoogstraat 34 jr. Merchant, brother-in-law of Jan, Simon Kramer, 63 jr. Shopkeeper, Dingenis Jeremiasse, 55 jr. Tailor.

On the big document where I pulled the above info from, I saw that Jan and Dina were, in fact, siblings, the children of Marinus and Jozina. But when I searched for siblings, I was dismayed to see that they had two sisters, Adriana and Wilhelmina–and only ONE brother, Nicolaas. This does not fit the portrait with all the young men.  While this might be explained away, the mother Jozina was alive in 1885 and 1886, not dying until 1896. And the mother is not in the photo.

My conclusion: We do not have a match.

But Jacob is not ready to give up on it. He has another scenario worked out, but for that we need more info on the Bijlo family!

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I might be off-the-blog for a week or two, but I’ll be back with more Remijnse information (I hope)!

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