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For all of you who predicted I would go off on a tangent, you get gold stars. Here is my first tangent of 2020.

I was asked by someone who works for the City of Portage to search for some photos in my Remine (Remijnse in the Netherlands) collection. While I was looking through the images, I ran across a photo that was clearly identified on the back–both the name and the year.

Clearly, the person on the other side is J. G. Remijnse, and the year mentioned is 1878.

Rather than mess around trying to figure out who the man was, I decided to go to the source–one of my contacts with the Remijnse family, Yvette Boertje. Yvette had contacted me about a photograph that I posted on this blog. Yvette’s great-great-great grandfather Marinus Remijnse was the brother of my great-great-great grandmother Johanna Remijnse DeKorn, so we share 4x great-grandparents and are 5th cousins.

Yvette provided all the Dutch to English translations for this post, which is quite a feat. Thank you so very much, Yvette, for your work on this project.

I was in luck because Yvette’s family was able to identify him almost certainly as Johan Gilles Remijnse, born 19 January 1878. He was the son of Marinus Remijnse (1854-1923) and Maria Pieternella De Ligny (1855-1938). Dr. Johan Gilles Remijnse was my second cousin, 3x removed, according to Ancestry.

Yvette wrote, “According to the following website: https://repertorium.library.uu.nl/node/2850 , his name was Johan Gilles Remijnse, born January 19, 1878. Gilles is also Willem. On this site you can also see the plaque and a more recent image of him.” I highly recommend you follow the link to see the comparison with the earlier image.

Dr. Remijnse worked at the municipal hospital in Rotterdam from 1920 to 1939. Here is a photo of the hospital provided by Yvette.

Yvette provided me with three newspaper clippings about Dr. Remijnse.

19-04-1939

Dr. J. G. Remijnse

Last presentation on the doctor’s course

They tell us:

When Dr. J.G. Remijnse had finished his well-attended doctor’s class at the hospital at the Coolsingel, there was a moment of silence, which Dr. H.W. van Rhijn from Dordrecht used to ask Dr. Remijnse if it was true that this was his final presentation of the doctor’s course.

Dr. Remijnse did not deny it, although the possibility to present again in the fall could not be excluded. Dr. van Rhijn felt obligated – and he thought he spoke on behalf of the whole auditorium – to tell Dr. Remijnse at this parting, that his consistently numerous listeners didn’t want to let him go without expressing their heartfelt thanks for his always so well-prepared and high-level presentations, that, because they are so useful for general practice – would always be unforgettable to them all.

He said that the hospital, but in particular his patients, but no less his colleagues, who had gotten used to his calm and contemplative teachings, would profoundly miss him and would continue to value his lessons substantially.

But they granted him his well-earned complete or partial rest, that he was taking.

Dr. Remijnse thanked him with kind words and said that he had given the presentations from a certain egotistical standpoint because it forced him at the very least to think more deeply, and therefore more beneficially, about the patients.

18-07-1939 (or is it 10-07-1939?)

Prof. Dr. J. G. Remijnse

Successor of prof. Baart de la Faille at Utrecht

The main board of the Dutch Society for the improvement of medicine has appointed Dr. J.G. Remijnse of Rotterdam as extraordinary professor of social medicine at Utrecht as the successor of prof. Dr. J.M. Baart de la Faille, who will resign October 15.

Johan Willem Remijnse was born in Goes in 1878. He attended the Grammar School at Middelburg and studied in Utrecht from 1897 to 1904, where he was promoted as a doctor. Already on January 1, 1905, he was appointed assistant of the surgical clinic under prof. Narath, where he worked until 1919. In 1914, he received the title of prosector under prof. Laméris. (a person who dissects dead bodies for examination or anatomical demonstration – YB)

In 1910, he also was established as a practicing surgeon in Utrecht, although during the years of mobilization, he was also working as a reserve-officer of health. He was relieved of this function in 1934, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.

On November 1, 1920, he started working as a surgeon at the municipal hospital at the Coolsingel in Rotterdam, from which function he will resign at the end of this year.

At the third centennial celebration of the RijksUniversity of Utrecht in 1936, Remijnse was promoted for his scientific contributions to medicinae doctor honoris causa. (Doctor of medicine – Y.B.)

In 1934, he received the ministerial assignment for educating interns at the surgical department of the hospital in Rotterdam, and he was appointed as an expert of the doctors’ committee at the faculty of surgery in Utrecht, by which he was once more attached to education.

Many of his articles were published in the Dutch Magazine of Surgery and foreign magazines. In 1925 and 1926 he was chairman of the Dutch Association of Surgery, since 1930, he is chairman of the Clinical Academy in Rotterdam. At the department Rotterdam of the Dutch Society to promoting surgery, he very much enjoys the trust of his fellow members, who appointed him to the chairman of the department council in 1933, in which function he also dedicated himself to social surgical questions.

31 – 01 – 1940

Prof. Dr. J. G. Remijnse says farewell

Tribute at the hospital at the Coolsingel

Yesterday, prof Dr. J.G. Remijnse, who’s been a surgeon of the hospital at the Coolsingel in Rotterdam since 1920 and who was recently appointed as professor at Utrecht, said farewell to his important profession in Rotterdam. In the doctors’ hall of the hospital, prof. Dr. J.G. Remijnse was honored by the hospital staff and the committee for the administration of municipal hospitals. Many were present for this occasion.

First, alderman (municipal councilor – Y.B.) Nivard, then Dr. S. Westra, the hospital chief, spoke. As a farewell, the hospital staff wanted to give Dr. Remijnse something, but they also wanted to keep something: that’s why the choice was made for a bronze plaque, created by artist Begeer, which shows the image of Dr. Remijnse with the years of his employment of the Rotterdam hospital. This plaque will be placed in the hospital near the surgical suites. A second casting was presented to Dr. Remijnse, to put in his home in Utrecht.

In conclusion, Dr. Westra wished the departing surgeon much happiness with the Royal award, which was presented to him by the alderman because it had pleased Her Majesty the Queen to bestow on prof. Dr. Remijnse the title of Officer in the Order of Orange-Nassau.

***

Note that the end of the above clipping shows that J. G. Remijnse was an Officer in the Order of Orange-Nassau. If you want to know more about this, check this link: Knight Orders.

Yvette also provided some death announcements from Dr. Remijnse’s family.

Clockwise top left:

Today passed way to our great sadness, after long and grievous suffering, our dear Mother, in-law and Grandmother

NEELTJE VEERHOEK

Widow of N. Remijnse at the age of over 78 years old.

Family Remijnse

Kapelle, July 19, 1947

The funeral was today, Tuesday.

===

Sole general announcement

Today our dear sister and sister-in-law, Mrs the widow

MARIA JOHANNA ADRIANA SILLEVIS- REMIJNSE

The Hague, September 22, 1956. Nieboerweg 21C.

On behalf of all:

Breukelen (where he lived)

Prof. Dr. J. G. Remijnse

No visitors.

===

Today, our dear mother, in-law, and grandmother, passed away in her sleep,

MARIA PIETERNELLA REMIJNSE-DE LINGY,

At the age of 83.

On behalf of all:

Dr. J.G. REMIJNSE

Rotterdam, March 7, 1938

No flowers.
No condolences.
The funeral is Thursday at 14:30 at the General Cemetary Crooswijk. (this means she was not Roman Catholic, or Jewish, they had their own cemetaries – Y.B.)

This is the sole announcement.

===

Sole and General announcement

Today passed away unexpectedly our fine Husband, Father, in-law, and Grandfather, Mister

  1. Remijnse

At the age of 69.

M.P. Remijnse-De Ligny (wife)

J.G. Remijnse (eldest son)

J.F. Remijnse – vd Made and children (Son, married to vd Made, and children)

J.P. Remijnse (son)

MJA Sillevis – Remijnse (daughter) (her anouncement is above)

A Sillevis (husband of MJA, above)

FW Remijnse (son, probably)

A Remijnse de Vrijs (son, married to De Vrijs)

Rotterdam December 11, 1923
Hoflaan 41 (adress)

No visitation.

The internment will occur at the General Cemetary Crooswijk (this means he was not Roman Catholic, or Jewish, they had their own cemetaries) on Saturday December 15 (a.s. is short voor aanstaande – meaning “this coming”  or “next” lit. the first Saturday that is to come from now.)

***

After his death the following was published in Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (Dutch Journal of Medicine May 8 1971. 115. Number 9), one of the world’s oldest journals.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In memoriam Prof. Dr. J.G. Remijnse –

On April 20th, 1971 Prof. Dr. Johan Gilles Remijnse passed away in Breukelen at the age of 93. He was former-professor at the RijksUniversity of Utrecht and as surgeon practiced the public praxis in Utrecht.

November 25, 1904 Remijnse was promoted and he became assistant to Prof. Narath and later chef de clinique at Prof. Lameris, who succeeded Prof. Narath.

Remijnse taught general medicine until 1920. In that year he was appointed city surgeon at the General Hospital at the Coolsingel in Rotterdam, where he succeeded Noordenbos, who had been called to Amsterdam. In this Rotterdam period Remijnse spent his happiest surgical years.

An important event voor Remijnse was receiving the doctorate in medicine honoris causa at the 300 centennial celebration of the Utrecht University.

After Remijnse said farewell to his surgical practice he was appointed Extraordinary Professor of social medicine in Utrecht. After several years, he withdrew permanently to spend more time on his hobbies.

Remijnse educated numerous surgeons. Besides operating techniques he taught students how, in his opinion, medicine would best be served. The character of his opinions was and always remained simplicity and honesty, for which he lead by example his students and coworkers in their duties as doctors.

When the milestone 90 was reached, a delegation of former-students gave him a certificate that made it clear once more how much Remijnse was appreciated by all of us. Later, a large number of his former-coworkers came to wish their ‘boss’ a happy birthday. They brought tangible evidence to show their affection for him and his wife. The ‘dernière vieillesse” had begun, but hope remained that our teacher would be around for some years to come.

The Archivum chirurgicum neerlandicum (1968, vol XX, Fasc. III) published an extensive “tribute.” In which an attempt was made to paint a portrait of the exceptional figure of Remijnse into our Homeland of surgery.

It was a huge blow for him that his wife passed away, whom he only survived by a few months. We will miss him.

Groningen, 24 April L.D. Eerland.

***

I am so glad that I stopped to follow this tangent and share my photo and Yvette’s information about Dr. Remijnse.

Someday I hope to research the uniform in the photo of the young J. G. Remijnse.

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I chose Adrian Zuidweg, Jr., my maternal grandfather, as the starting point for this project of filling in the information/document gaps of my direct ancestors. His family inspired the blog because of the photograph collection that Grandpa had owned, which included glass negatives from the photography of his uncle, Joseph DeKorn.

I’ve always known that Grandpa was born on 31 October 1908 in Kalamazoo, Michigan.  What I didn’t realize was that I had no record or documentation of that birth! So that was the first gap I set out to fill.

I wrote Wayne Loney, the genealogist in Kalamazoo who has helped me in the past. He found Grandpa’s birth recorded on the county record birth book: book 6, page 146, record 10294. Adrian Zuidweg, white male, was born in the City of Kalamazoo to father Adrian Zuidweg and mother Cora DeKorn. Adrian Sr’s place of birth was listed as Holland, and Cora’s was not listed. The residence was Kalamazoo. Adrian Sr.’s occupation was “Fish Dealer.” Yes, he owned a fish market.

Wayne shared a tip with me: not to order a birth certificate from county because they would just type up the same info that the record shows, affix their seal, and charge me for it. I took his advice, so I am just posting the following (he’s second to last):

As I continued down my list of the most basic documents for genealogy, I realized that I also did not have a record of the 21 May 1932 marriage of my grandparents. They were married in Indiana, not Michigan, and I had not been able to find the record before. This time, I found enough information online to order the marriage record and certificate from St. Joseph County. They have my request, and I am awaiting the documents.

I had 3 of the 4 census records that would be available. I had a copy of 1910, 1920, and 1930, but did not have 1940. His name didn’t come up in a search for that one, but knowing how often his name was mangled, I decided to search by address instead. And there I found Grandpa with Grandma, mom, and my uncle. See lines 6-9 below.

There is a military record for Grandpa, although he was too young for WWI and too old for WWII. He registered for WW2, though.

At one time I made a Findagrave profile for him, and I have a photograph of the headstone he shares with Grandma.

I also have Grandpa’s death certificate because when I undertook the project of searching specifically for death records of my direct ancestors I located it.

Question for researchers: what is the best way to find out a burial date? I can assume in many cases that it is the date of the funeral, which I can get from most obituaries. Are there other ways to make sure?

With this new emphasis on filling in the gaps, I saw that I did not have Grandpa’s obituary. So I contacted the Kalamazoo Public Library and they found two obituaries in the Kalamazoo Gazette, published one day apart. I will post them here. Here is the first one:

With this information, I would say that Grandpa’s burial occurred on Saturday, April 15, 2000.

The next one mentions a brave and scary time in my grandfather’s life when he stood up against other people.

 

Here is a transcription of the second obit.

Adrian Zuidweg’s work ethic, friendliness, and reputation for honesty probably would have been enough by themselves to ensure his success as the owner of a gas station.

But Zuidweg added to that a desire to give his customers the absolute lowest price he could on gasline, which endeared him to the gas-buying public, but didn’t win him friends among other gas station owners.

“He always wanted to try to give his customers the lowest possible price he could provide them and still make money,” said his son, Donald Zuidweg. “He got a lot of static from the Retail Gasoline Dealers Association, but he did his own thing.”

Zuidweg’s Sunoco station on South Burdick at Balch Street was front-page news in 1965 when other service station operators and employees, upset that he was charging 31 cents a gallon to their 34 cents, formed a gas-pump blockade, lining up for a nickel or dime’s worth of gas each and insisting that Zuidweg check their oil and water and wash their windshields as part of the bargain.

Zuidweg said he made about $1 during the three-hour blockade.

The ploy backfired, however, when customers who read about his lower prices in the newspaper showed up the next day to fill their tanks.

Zuidweg, a lifelong Kalamazoo area resident who died Thursday at his Portage residence at the age of 91, was a hard-worker who always mnaged to find time for his family, said Donald Zuidweg, who began helping his father when he was 4 and continued working at the station until he was through with graduate studies.

“I think I learned as much about business and people (by) working with him as I did in school.” Donald Zuidweg said.

“He worked very hard six days a week, but never worked on Sunday,” the son said. “We always had family time on Sunday.”

Although Adrian Zuidweg tried to give his customers the best deal he could, he also made sure his family had all they needed.

“He always provided for his family and put three kids through college,” his son said.

Zuidweg, who was born Oct. 31, 1908, in Kalamazoo, left school in his teens because his parents became ill and he had to take care of them.

His first job was working in the fish market his family owned. When they sold it, he started a garden and would walk north on Burdick, peddling his produce to neighbors.

After that, he worked at a confectionary owned by his father, which he eventually razed and replaced with the service station he ran until his retirement in 1972.

Zuidweg retired before self-service gasoline stations came into vogue, but understood the reasons for the changes in the business, his son said.

“It bothered him at first to see women have to fill up their own cars, but he knew that . . . (times were) changing,” Donald Zuidweg said.

Adrian Zuidweg and his wife, Edna, loved to travel and ventured farther and farther from home as time went on.

“After all of us (children) were through college, he and my mother went around the world several times,” Donald Zuidweg said.

Adrian Zuidweg was a member of First United Methodist Church in Kalamazoo for more than 60 years and served as Sunday school treasurer for nearly half that time.

Surviving are Edna, his wife of 67 years, two daughters and a son, Janet and Rudy Hanson and Donald and Jean Zuidweg of Kalamazoo and Alice Carpentier of Portage, six grandchildren, and 10 great-grandchildren.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. today at First United Methodist Church, 212 S. Park, with burial in Mount Ever Rest Cemetery.

I remember when the gas war happened because my father was there at the station and came home telling my mother about it. Although the obituary doesn’t mention it, my father said that the men threatened violence against Grandpa.

Grandpa stood up for what he thought was right.

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Over two years ago I published this post, asking for the identity of a girl in a photo I discovered. I have another clue now, which I will post at the end.

***

The photograph was created from a glass negative taken by Joseph DeKorn. All of his photographs were taken between approximately 1895 and 1918, and the majority were shot in Kalamazoo.

Although I don’t know who this lovely girl is, I have hopes that I can eventually discover her identity. The juxtaposition of the two houses might lead to a solution, for instance.

Any ideas on the time period of the dress, hair, and shoes (within that 1895-1918 range)?

I remember wearing tights that bagged at the knees like these stockings. Do you think they are cotton?

I’ll put Balch Street and Burdick Street in the tags for this post, just in case it was taken in the neighborhood where Joseph lived.

***

OK, THE NEW CLUE.

I found another photo of the girl, taken probably at the same time, at the same place, but with the addition of an adult Alice Leeuwenhoek, but most likely before her marriage to Clarence Moerdyk.  The above photo was made from a glass negative, but this one was an actual photograph I found in a different family collection.

Alice was born in 1897, so can we say that this photo is somewhere around 1917?

 

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This post was published on 18 September 2019, but I subsequently received information so that I can update this post. I will bold my additions. My amazing blogger buddy, José at Enhanced News Archive went all the way to the Kalamazoo Public Library to find the answer to the question I posed in my original post: is there an announcement in the newspaper about the wedding of Alice and Clarence. I wanted to see where they were married and thought the info might have been published. I searched in Genealogy Bank for the article in the Kalamazoo Gazette, but I could find nothing. If you read the original post, skip to the next bolded passage.

On 12 September 1923, Grandpa’s cousin Alice Leeuwenhoek married Clarence Dewey Moerdyk in Kalamazoo. They are the last couple listed on the following (cropped) image.

Clarence was 25 and Alice 26. He held a job as a foreman, and she had no employment. I found that interesting since the family thinks of her as an accomplished seamstress. In fact, I discovered a jottings ad from 14 May 1922 about Alice’s trade. She advertises her hemstitching and picoting, which is an embroidery loop edging used as ornamentation.

Right under Alice’s ad is one for the family’s Ramona Park dancing.

Their fathers are listed: Peter Moerdyk and Lambertus (Uncle Lou) Leeuwenhoek.

Their mothers were Cora Stevens and Jennie (Aunt Jen) DeKorn.

The couple was married by Benjamin Laman, Minister of the Gospel. Mr. Laman had become the 4th pastor of Bethany Reformed Church on 7 June 1923, just three months before Alice’s wedding. I tried to find a society page mention to discover if they were married in someone’s home, but neglected to find anything. In the search, I found articles about both their parents’ weddings though!

José found the article the old-fashioned way! By searching the microfiche of the newspaper at the Kalamazoo Public Library! So much for the accuracy of the cataloging skills at Genealogy Bank. It’s a reminder that there is NOTHING like primary sources in genealogy or family research. I will post the article itself and at the end of this post I will post the full front page of the newspaper from that date: 12 September 1923.

Look at this great info. First of all, now I know where Alice and Clarence were married: in Reverend Laman’s (sic in the article) home. I have to wonder if this was a parsonage owned by the church. Then we can see that they honeymooned in Chicago and were going to live temporarily with her parents, Lou and Jennie Leeuwenhoek, at 110 Balch Street. So they didn’t have a lot of extra cash would be my guess. Another great piece of information is that Alice’s dress was tan. I can see that the dress below definitely could be tan, but I’m not sure that it is crepe de chine. Is it?

I wrote about the church here: Bethany Reformed Church, circa 1918

and about Alice’s marriage here: Aunt Jen and Uncle Lou’s SIL Clarence Moerdyk

When I wrote these posts I did not know that I had in my possession the wedding portrait of Alice and Clarence. In my opinion, it’s a stunning photograph, mainly because of Alice’s sense of style and model’s grace.

I really love Alice’s hat!!!

The portrait is in a cardboard folder.

I hate to take it out of the folder, but I would bet that the cardboard is not acid-free. I think I will keep the parts separate, in 2 different acid-free sleeves, and then tape them together.

I’m sure Alice would love that we admired her dress and hat all these years later.

Here is the full front page of the Kalamazoo Gazette from 12 September 1923:

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Philip DeKorn’s niece–his brother Richard’s daughter–didn’t want the family documents Phil left behind. She has enough papers, and she is not particularly interested in genealogy. Phil’s niece through his wife Marianne, Sue Haadsma-Svensson, is a genealogist who has worked extensively on her branches and compiled several books, as well. She understands the value of these papers. My mother told her about my interest in family history and about this blog, and she very kindly mailed me the documents that were discovered.

Opening the package was quite exciting as I didn’t know what I would find.

There are original death certificates for both Uncle Joe and Aunt Tena, Phil’s parents. There are also newspaper articles, photographs, and letters. Once I have a chance to scan (and digitize) everything and to put each document and photograph into an archival sleeve, I will post my discoveries!

Sue gave me this photo of sailor Phil home on temporary leave on 4 July 1944 sitting with his parents, Uncle Joe and Aunt Tena.

 

 

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The last living DeKorn (carrying the name) from the Boudewijn (1816-1873) and Johanna (Remijnse) (1817-1864) family has passed away at age 97.

Philip Eugene DeKorn was one of two children of Joseph DeKorn. Philip’s brother Richard died in 2004. Joseph, my grandfather’s uncle, took many of the photos I shared on this blog. Phil is the last of Kalamazoo contractor and brick mason Richard DeKorn’s grandchildren to pass.

I would like to share Phil’s obituary today because it shows he was one of the “Greatest Generation,” serving in WWII in the U.S. Navy. The obituary is available at this link.

DeKorn, Philip 8/4/1922 – 9/6/2019 Grand Rapids Philip Eugene DeKorn was born in the community of Fairview in Grand Rapids, Michigan on August 4, 1922, the son of Joseph Peter and Christina (Blandford) DeKorn. He passed away September 6, 2019 at the age of 97. Philip attended and graduated from Fairview School, Union High School and Grand Rapids Junior College. On August 28, 1942, he enlisted in the US Navy during World War II. He took naval training at the US Naval Center, Great Lakes, IL and US Radar School at Virginia Beach, VA. He was then assigned to the USS Uhlmann (DD607) and served as a radar operator in CIC (Combat Information Center) until the end of World War II. CIC had direct radio and radar communication with other US Third Fleet ships. After World War II, he completed his college education and graduated from the University of Michigan School of Business Administration in 1950. He then worked as a sales representative for the Mennen Company and Revere Copper and Brass Inc. On January 5, 1968, Phil married Marianne Haadsma and they were together for almost 50 years. Marianne passed away October 2, 2017. Phil was also predeceased by his older brother, Richard B. DeKorn, who passed away on June 20, 2004. Phil is survived by his brother-in-law Roger Haadsma, his nieces and nephews and their families: Gayle (Jay) Polverelli, Jim (Luanne) Haadsma, Luanne (Larry) Dewey, Mari Dawley, Gail Sherry, Sue (Kjell) Haadsma-Svensson, Bob (Jen) Haadsma, Ken (Judy) Glupker, and Kathy (Ken) Basoff. The family would like to thank Theresa Johnson for all the special care she gave Phil throughout his final years. The family would also like to thank Gloria from Kindred Hospice for her caring work. The family will greet relatives and friends Monday, September 9, 2019 at the Stegenga Funeral Chapel, 1601 Post Dr. NE from 11:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. Funeral services will follow at 12:00. Inurnment will be at Rosedale Memorial Park. Memorials can be made to the General Fund at First Reformed Church, Holland Michigan or Kindred Hospice, Grand Rapids. To share a photo, memory and sign the online guestbook please visit www.stegengafuneralchapel.com

Published in Grand Rapids Press on Sept. 8, 2019

Like his father before him, Phil graduated from the University of Michigan. Although he never had children, Phil still had a close family through the members of his wife Marianne’s family and through his brother Richard’s family.

Rest in peace, Philip Eugene DeKorn. Thank you for your service, sir.

Phil DeKorn at the plaque for the Kalamazoo State Hospital water tower built by his grandfather Richard DeKorn

###

As a side note, you can see that two of Phil’s nieces are named Luanne, spelling it correctly as I do . . . .

In case you wonder how I go about deciding when to post a recent passing on my blog, all I can tell you is I decide on a case by case basis. When my father died, I posted because so many knew he had been sick for months and it seemed strange not to say anything. But during the past few years I have also lost two dear aunts and a cousin, and I did not post about these because their deaths were more sudden and shocking. Our grief, individually and as a family, felt too raw to write about them so soon.

Here are a few more photos of a day Phil spent with his wife Marianne and his cousin’s children, my mom Janet, my father Rudy, Uncle Don, and Aunt Jean at the water tower.

Don, Jean, Phil, Marianne, Rudy, Janet

 


 

The following (sorry it’s angled) shows a layout of the hospital with the water tower in the center. I will have to ask Uncle Don or Mom to chime in here. Is that how the layout really was at one time? It looks like the classic “Panopticon” that Michel Foucault wrote about–a tall tower to watch the prisoners, er, patients. But as we know this is a water tower, not meant to be a guard tower.

 

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Here is an unidentified photo from a beautiful antique photo album from the family–specifically one from Uncle Don. The album is focused on the Remine side of the family, which means the DeKorn branch and includes Zuidwegs, Paaks, and Bassas.

 

Any input about the clothing or portrait style would be appreciated. I suspect this is a wedding portrait because good “Sunday” dresses were more in line with the wedding dresses my ancestors wore than what we think of today as white lacy wedding gowns.

I’m not impressed by Mr. Philley’s photography because of the item growing out of the lady’s head . . . .

 

But the name is important because it helps narrow down the time period. Several years ago, on the blog Bushwhacking Genealogy a list of early Kalamazoo photographers was listed with their approximate years of operation.

 

Philley, Silas (Jr.): Lived 1846-1926. In business at least 1895-1900. Shoemaker in 1887 and again in 1920.
1895: 303 E. Main
1899: 305 E. Main
1900: in census as photographer
I’m glad he went back to shoemaking.
I know I need to go through my family tree and look for marriages that occurred in Kalamazoo between 1895 and 1900. The problem is that Ancestry doesn’t allow for searches like that.
Does anyone know of a genealogy software that does sorting and filtering that makes it easy to search?
Another way I can search for this couple is by looking for photographs of them when they were older. They both have distinctive elements to their faces, and I suspect she might have become heavier as she got older.
I’m open, as usual, to suggestions! (Sorry about the formatting issues here).

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I have a lot of photographs of Alice Leeuwenhoek. She was an only child, and I suspect she might have been doted upon. And maybe she was a favorite subject of her uncle, Joseph DeKorn, the family photographer. Alice was born in 1897, and Joseph was born in 1881. He was doing a lot of photography when she was growing up, and she lived next door.

Here are a couple of photos that are marked with Alice’s name on the back.

Alice looks so cute here. She’s wearing a hat that looks to me like an Easter bonnet, especially on a child so small. Her coat with the cute flaps reminds me of a dress coat I bought for my daughter when she was little. She had been wearing hand-me-down dresses for dressup, and I wanted her to have one nice outfit, so I bought her a red dress with matching red coat.  The coat had a little cape very similar to Alice’s coat. Eighty-some years later.

Here is one from 1914. It doesn’t look to me a lot like Alice, but it is a tall lady with dark hair standing by the side of Richard DeKorn’s house. Richard was Alice’s grandfather, as well as Grandpa’s grandfather. And the photo is labeled Alice!

Now is when I need a horse expert. If Derrick stops by, I know he’ll know. Is this a pony? The reason I think so is that the proportions seem mature.

I would know Richard’s house anywhere because of the light stripe through the dark brick. Very distinctive.

 

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My maternal grandmother, (Lucille) Edna Mulder Zuidweg, was born in 1912 on this day.  This is one of my favorite photographs of Grandma and me.

I’m about five and wearing my favorite violet striped dress. This was a time in my life that I was spending a lot of time at Grandma and Grandpa’s house because I went to kindergarten across the street at McKinley school and stayed the rest of the day at their house while my parents were working. In this photo, it is dark outside, and I think this photograph was taken at night when others were in the living room. I associate this photo with eating ice cream that particular night . . . .

Happy birthday, Grandma. You are very missed.

Last week I posted two old photos and didn’t have a lot of information about them. With the help of some people on a Facebook group, especially intrepid FindaGrave photographer Jeff Phillips, the two little kids have been identified as Alice Leeuwenhoek and Harold Remine. I’ve written about both of them many times.  My mother reminded me that yesterday was Alice’s birthday (1897).

The house in the other photograph has probably been identified as well.

Here it is at the address 110 Balch Street.

That is it with the fresh coat of gray paint. Now look to our right and you just can just the dark brown brick corner house between the trees. That is the Richard DeKorn house I’ve written about so much. This gray house is next door to that house.

Guess who lived in that house (where the four boys are standing) in those days? Take a look:

 

 

Yes, the Leeuwenhoeks lived there, right next to Alice’s maternal grandparents Richard and Alice, and possibly her aunt (my great-grandmother Cora and her husband Adrian who lived with Cora’s parents). It appears that sometime between 1900 and 1910 Cora and Adrian moved from a home on the other side of Balch to her parents’ house. It’s possible that Richard owned that home at 121 Balch, but I have not investigated land records.

Any ideas on how to go about doing so?

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These two old photographs are in poor condition and not labelled. I don’t know who the boys are. The girl could be Alice Leewenhoek, born 1897.

It is likely that the photographs were taken in the Burdick-Balch neighborhood in Kalamazoo.

These boys do not look too happy to be at work. Although the pitchfork made me think gardening, there seems to be a building material stacked behind them. What do you think is going on?

Any insights would be greatly appreciated!

Make it a good week!

UPDATE: Jose challenged me to check out the book the little girl is holding. It looks like Cinderella illustrations to me. Cinderella or Ashenputtel or Cendrillon on our left and the stepsisters on the right. See what you think. I made a Pinterest board with illustrations of Cinderella with her broom: Cinderella with Broom

 

 

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