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Archive for the ‘Zeeland, the Netherlands, history’ Category

This week I worked on Grandpa’s grandmother, Jennegien (Jennie) Bomhoff Zuidweg, born 5 March 1838 in Zwolle, Overjissel, Netherlands. Unlike most of my Dutch ancestors, Jennie was not born in Zeeland. Overjissel is in the eastern part of the country and centuries ago was part of Utrecht. It might always remain a mystery how she came to marry a man from Zeeland.

You can find out about Jennie in these posts. A lot of information can be found there.

What Did She Keep in All Those Pockets?

Kalamazoo Woman Supports WWI Troops

Jennie died when Grandpa was about 16 years old. I wish I could ask him more information about her now, but maybe he didn’t remember that much about her. Jennie and Johannes Zuidweg were almost a generation older than Grandpa’s other grandparents, Richard and Alice DeKorn. They also immigrated when they were pretty old, whereas Richard was a tiny boy and Alice a teen, so Johannes and Jennie’s habits would have been European and not American. My impression is that it’s likely that the Zuidwegs were not as central to the lives of the rest of the family in the way that the DeKorns were.

A curious story that my grandfather told me very insistently was that Jennie’s family was Jewish and that made his father Jewish. Because Grandpa was sure, I was sure. However, once Jennie’s documents were discovered it became clear that this could not be true.  I don’t know where the story originated or if there is some truth hidden somehow behind the documents. Without more information, my conclusion is that Jennie came from a Protestant family.

I had marriage, death, 1910 census, headstone, photo, and I manage her memorial page on Findagrave.

I also had her birth record, but hadn’t loaded it on Ancestry or really done anything with it. I asked people on Dutch Genealogy group on Facebook to read the birth record for me. I was able to confirm the birth date that I had of 5 March 1838, the place being Zwolle, and the names of her parents. I also received the names of the witnesses: 1) Lambert Velthuis, age 37 job peat carrier living in Zwolle 2) Johannes Weijl age 40 peat carrier living in Zwolle.

This week I made a computer folder and put all Jennie’s records in it. I also ordered her obituary from the Kalamazoo Public Library. Since Michigan is locked down right now, it might be awhile, but I hope eventually they can find it

As with Jennie’s husband, Johannes, I’m waiting immigration and naturalization info from Amberly.

I am particularly grateful that I have three photographs of Jennie, and that Grandpa actually knew her. Because of my grandfather’s stories, he has brought to life for me all the family members that he once knew when he was young.

 

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I will continue to move forward with updates about my fill in the gaps project. If anything, the pandemic has reinforced to me that I need to get the rudiments of my family history completed so that I can get digital copies to other family members.

So I moved on to Grandpa’s Zuidweg grandfather, Johannes Zuidweg, born 23 December 1842 in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands.

You can find out about him in these posts. A lot of information can be found there.

I have these records: birth, marriage, criminal, death, obituary, 1910 census, headstone, photo, and I manage his memorial page on Findagrave.

Did Johannes serve in the Dutch military? I did ask Yvette to research this question, and this is her summary reply:

Johannes Zuijdweg, born 1842. He was found fit for duty and designated to serve.
Unfortunately, the enlistment registers did not identify the regiment he served in, so his
military records could not be located.

What a shame! I would love to know more about his military service, especially in light of the disturbing news that he served two months in jail for theft after the accidental death of son Lucas. I discuss this crime in the two blog posts above.

Here is Yvette’s more detailed response:

Johannes Zuijdweg in militia registration, 1861
Source: Goes, lists of men registered for the National Militia, levies 1851-1862, 1851 no. 8,
Johannes Zuijdweg; call no. 1438, archives of the city of Goes, 1851-1919, Goes Municipal
Archives, Goes; scans provided by Goes Municipal Archives.
Abstract:
No. 8, Johannes Zuijdweg, born Goes 23 December 1842.
Physical description: 1.601 m, long face, narrow forehead, grey eyes, ordinary nose and
mouth, round chin, brown hair and eyebrows, no noticeable marks.

Son of Adriaan [Zuijdweg] and Johanna Mulder
Occupation: “kruidewerker” [spice worker, probably: grocer], father deceased, mother maid
Informant: himself.
Johannes Zuijdweg in militia enlistment, 1861
Source: Goes, lists of men registered for the National Militia, levies 1854-1862, 1861 no. 36,
Johannes Zuijdweg; call no. 1484, archives of the city of Goes, 1851-1919, Goes Municipal
Archives, Goes; scans provided by Goes Municipal Archives.
Abstract:
No. 36, Johannes Zuijdweg, born Goes 23 December 1842.
Height: 1.601 m
Son of Adriaan [Zuijdweg] and Johanna Mulder.
Occupation: “kruidenwerker” [grocer], father deceased, mother maid
Informant: himself
Lot number 59
Designated to serve.
Regiment: [blank]
These registers show that Johannes Zuijdweg was found fit for duty and designated to serve.
Unfortunately, the register does not indicate which regiment he was in, so his military record could
not be located.

As far as Johannes’ immigration and naturalization information, I am awaiting the completion of the project Amberly is undertaking for me. He only lived in the United States for ten years before his death (1901-1911), so I think it’s unlikely that he was naturalized.

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I am going to avoid the elephant in the room in this post. You know, the Thing that has taken over our lives. But let’s go back to family history and just pretend for a few minutes that everything is normal.

So far I have searched for gaps in my immediate maternal ancestors going back through the great-grandparents.  From that point on, this is what I have been up to. I am bolding the questions I have in case anyone can answer.

  • All my Findagrave memorials through great-grandparents (direct line only) are completed for me and through grandparents for my husband. This means that I have sponsored them and now manage the memorials and can make appropriate edits and additions.
  • I have requested management of my maternal great-great-grandparents memorials from the current managers. There were 8. Almost immediately the manager of Peter and Nellie Mulder turned it over to me. That was so kind. I would have thanked him or her, but the person is not accepting messages at Findagrave. I am waiting to hear on the other six.
  • I requested management of my father’s paternal grandmother who was the first of my grandfather’s branch to die in the United States, and very quickly the manager transferred management to me. I recognized that it was a man I have corresponded with over the family on Ancestry. His wife is related to the branch, but is not a direct descendant of my great-grandmother. I was able to thank him. I already manage both paternal grandparents and my paternal grandmother’s parents. That means that I manage memorials for the all the paternals that are buried in this country.
  • I am making folders on my computer and putting docs on Ancestry for my ancestors on my father’s side, although not posting about them. Have my grandparents done so far. Need to keep moving backwards.
  • Amberly is working on immigration and naturalizations for all my ancestors who immigrated to this country.  I have some of the research findings now.
  • Yvette is working on the Dutch military records going back to my 3x greats. I have some of these research findings, as well.
  • I need 1920 census record for my paternal grandfather and 1900 census record for my paternal grandmother. I’ve searched for their other family members, but can’t find these entries. How certain are we that everyone is in the census?
  • Another question: I can’t find a social security number for my paternal grandmother. She worked until the 1950s (60s?) so why not?

Yvette Hoitink was able to find the military records for my great-grandfather, Adrian Zuidweg (Adriaan Zuijdweg), born 1871 in Goes.

This was particularly exciting for me because of the photograph. Here is a summary of what Yvette discovered:

He entered the 3rd regiment infantry on 11 May 1891. On 2 November 1891, he was promoted to corporal. On 30 July 1892 he was sent on grand leave. He did not fulfill his military duties but emigrated before his service was completed. He was registered as a deserter on 7 December 1893.

This is what Yvette explained about the “grand leave.”

Military service was five years. Typically, this consisted of eighteen months of active service followed by grand leave. At the end of their service, they were called back up for final training and then received their passport of fulfilled service. People who emigrated during grand leave were considered deserters and were registered in the police journal.

Here is the more detailed account of Adriaan’s military service.

ADRIAAN ZUIJDWEG
Posited: Adriaan did not marry in the Netherlands, so there are no marriage supplements. Since he emigrated, it is possible he went before completing his service.
Algemeen Politieblad 1894 Source: Algemeen Politieblad (1894), p. 555, entry 591, Adriaan Zuijdweg.
Translation
591. Adriaan Zuijdweg, soldier-corporal in the 3rd regiment infantry, born in Goes (Zeeland) 3 Jan. 1871, height 1.672 meters, long face, high forehead, blue eyes, small nose and mouth, round chin, blond hair and eyebrows, deserted 7 December.
7

This shows that Adriaan Zuijdweg was listed as a deserter in the police journal. He deserted on 7 December 1893. He would have been 22 years old, which suggests he had finished basic training and left while on grand leave.
Military record of Adriaan Zuijdweg Source: 3rd Regiment Infantry (Netherlands), muster roll of petty officers and men, 1890-1891, no. 80475, Adriaan Zuijdweg; digital film 008480935, FamilySearch (ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C39V-FQ7G-B : accessed 10 March 2020).
Abstract:
Number 80475. Adriaan Zuijdweg Father: Johannes [Zuijdweg], mother Jennegien Bomhoff Both Goes, 3 January 1871. Physical description upon arrival: 1.62 m, long face, high forehead, blue eyes, small nose and mouth, round chin, blond hair and eyebrows, no noticeable marks. On 11 May 1891 recruited as part of the levy of 1891 under number 40. On 30 July 1892 on grand leave [blank] returned [blank] on grand leave] Promoted to soldier-corporal 2 November 1891
On 7 December 1893 removed as deserter because not responding to being called to duty.
This confirms he did not return from grand leave and was marked as a deserter.

Very interesting that he left before completing his military duty. But such a long period of service for a young man eager to get on with his life. After all, this was not voluntary service, but the LUCK OF THE DRAW, much like our own draft (when we’ve had a draft).

So let’s look at Adriaan’s timeline. He did not return to duty on 7 December 1893. He seems to have shown up in the United States in 1893.

On 4 April 1894, his only brother Lucas was killed in an accident by falling on a ship’s anchor, so Adriaan was already in the United States. Thus, it seems to me that the reason he left the Dutch Army and the Netherlands was to begin a new life in the  United States. He was the first in his family. Eventually his parents and then sister and brother-in-law followed. They all settled in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Because Adriaan lived a reputable life in Kalamazoo and raised an upstanding son, my grandfather, I don’t view him as a military deserter. But maybe the Dutch viewpoint would be different.

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I will be moving forward–I mean backward!–to other ancestors in my efforts to fill in the gaps. However, I’ve been gone for awhile, and I haven’t had a chance to do any research.

That said, Amberly did find records for me, and I will be posting about the results in the future. Also, the social security app I ordered for Charles Mulder arrived, but it did not give me any information I didn’t already have. The date on the application is 21 November 1955. Since Great-Grandpa was born in 1885, why would he apply at that late date for his social security number?

Ever so often I have wondered if being left-handed, as I am, is genetic, as I had been told. My mother isn’t left-handed, and neither was my father. But my grandfather, Adrian Zuidweg, was left-handed. I get my long-term memory and storytelling from him. I am good at math, and I believe he was, as well. So we have a lot in common.

Grandpa Adrian Zuidweg with my son Marc

Apparently, they have discovered the gene that causes left-handedness, although it’s not a cut-and-dried case of who gets to be left-handed, as it is with right-handers.

For me, the most interesting article about left-handedness is one that argues that the Netherlands has the highest percentage of left-handers in the world. I’m not presenting this as “gospel,” but it is fun. Click here or click on the image:

I read one article that insists that there is an environmental component to handedness, as if it isn’t innate. Trust me, my hand preference was completely innate. With two right-handed parents and no siblings until I was eight years old, I used the hand that came naturally to me.

Here is a very clear image of Grandpa with his cousins Dick and Phil DeKorn in the 1920s (the boys were born in 1920 and 1922). This could possibly be Long Lake in Portage, Michigan, but my family was associated with several different lakes, so it is impossible to know for sure.

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Last maternal great-grandparent: Charles Mulder of Caledonia, Michigan. He was the only great-grandparent I knew–and I adored him.

Luanne and her great-grandfather Charles Mulder

Charles was born Karel Pieter Phillipus Mulder on 6 March 1885 in Goes, Zeeland, Netherlands. On my Ancestry page for Charles, I had posted a link to his birth record, but had not downloaded it. I now downloaded it, added it to his Ancestry page, and put it into a folder for all of his documents.

Amberly is helping me with his naturalization info. I do have a ship record (the Zandaam), so I know two-year-old Charles arrived in the U.S. with his parents and his brother Jan, a baby of one. Jan died very soon after the family immigrated.

In fact, I made the Charles folder because I had not yet done so. To that folder, I added his marriage record, death record, and all the census records that feature Charles: 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940. I also downloaded and added his military registrations for both WWI and WWII.

I was surprised to see that Charles had a social security number. For the sake of dotting all the Is and all that, I ordered  his application.

Charles and his wife Clara share a headstone, and I have that photograph. I added it to Ancestry and to the new folder.

I found that I had a copy of Charles’ obituary, so I added it to Ancestry and to the folder on my computer.

Reading over my great-grandfather’s obituary I was shocked to see he only lived to be 82 years old. I was about 12 when he passed away, and I remember feeling frustrated that I was not allowed to attend his funeral since I adored him. But I thought he was about  a zillion years old. No, he was elderly, but only 82. That doesn’t even seem old to me today.

Once again, I had sponsored my great-grandfather’s page on Findagrave, but am not managing it. I have submitted a request to transfer management to me, but I suspect as with the others I have mentioned before, that I have asked in the past and been ignored. We will see what happens.

 

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I’ll be taking a little blog break for a couple of weeks. Hope all is well with you and yours. I also hope that when I begin the search for gaps in my great-greats I don’t get too discouraged!

 

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For all of you who predicted I would go off on a tangent, you get gold stars. Here is my first tangent of 2020.

I was asked by someone who works for the City of Portage to search for some photos in my Remine (Remijnse in the Netherlands) collection. While I was looking through the images, I ran across a photo that was clearly identified on the back–both the name and the year.

Clearly, the person on the other side is J. G. Remijnse, and the year mentioned is 1878.

Rather than mess around trying to figure out who the man was, I decided to go to the source–one of my contacts with the Remijnse family, Yvette Boertje. Yvette had contacted me about a photograph that I posted on this blog. Yvette’s great-great-great grandfather Marinus Remijnse was the brother of my great-great-great grandmother Johanna Remijnse DeKorn, so we share 4x great-grandparents and are 5th cousins.

Yvette provided all the Dutch to English translations for this post, which is quite a feat. Thank you so very much, Yvette, for your work on this project.

I was in luck because Yvette’s family was able to identify him almost certainly as Johan Gilles Remijnse, born 19 January 1878. He was the son of Marinus Remijnse (1854-1923) and Maria Pieternella De Ligny (1855-1938). Dr. Johan Gilles Remijnse was my second cousin, 3x removed, according to Ancestry.

Yvette wrote, “According to the following website: https://repertorium.library.uu.nl/node/2850 , his name was Johan Gilles Remijnse, born January 19, 1878. Gilles is also Willem. On this site you can also see the plaque and a more recent image of him.” I highly recommend you follow the link to see the comparison with the earlier image.

Dr. Remijnse worked at the municipal hospital in Rotterdam from 1920 to 1939. Here is a photo of the hospital provided by Yvette.

Yvette provided me with three newspaper clippings about Dr. Remijnse.

19-04-1939

Dr. J. G. Remijnse

Last presentation on the doctor’s course

They tell us:

When Dr. J.G. Remijnse had finished his well-attended doctor’s class at the hospital at the Coolsingel, there was a moment of silence, which Dr. H.W. van Rhijn from Dordrecht used to ask Dr. Remijnse if it was true that this was his final presentation of the doctor’s course.

Dr. Remijnse did not deny it, although the possibility to present again in the fall could not be excluded. Dr. van Rhijn felt obligated – and he thought he spoke on behalf of the whole auditorium – to tell Dr. Remijnse at this parting, that his consistently numerous listeners didn’t want to let him go without expressing their heartfelt thanks for his always so well-prepared and high-level presentations, that, because they are so useful for general practice – would always be unforgettable to them all.

He said that the hospital, but in particular his patients, but no less his colleagues, who had gotten used to his calm and contemplative teachings, would profoundly miss him and would continue to value his lessons substantially.

But they granted him his well-earned complete or partial rest, that he was taking.

Dr. Remijnse thanked him with kind words and said that he had given the presentations from a certain egotistical standpoint because it forced him at the very least to think more deeply, and therefore more beneficially, about the patients.

18-07-1939 (or is it 10-07-1939?)

Prof. Dr. J. G. Remijnse

Successor of prof. Baart de la Faille at Utrecht

The main board of the Dutch Society for the improvement of medicine has appointed Dr. J.G. Remijnse of Rotterdam as extraordinary professor of social medicine at Utrecht as the successor of prof. Dr. J.M. Baart de la Faille, who will resign October 15.

Johan Willem Remijnse was born in Goes in 1878. He attended the Grammar School at Middelburg and studied in Utrecht from 1897 to 1904, where he was promoted as a doctor. Already on January 1, 1905, he was appointed assistant of the surgical clinic under prof. Narath, where he worked until 1919. In 1914, he received the title of prosector under prof. Laméris. (a person who dissects dead bodies for examination or anatomical demonstration – YB)

In 1910, he also was established as a practicing surgeon in Utrecht, although during the years of mobilization, he was also working as a reserve-officer of health. He was relieved of this function in 1934, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.

On November 1, 1920, he started working as a surgeon at the municipal hospital at the Coolsingel in Rotterdam, from which function he will resign at the end of this year.

At the third centennial celebration of the RijksUniversity of Utrecht in 1936, Remijnse was promoted for his scientific contributions to medicinae doctor honoris causa. (Doctor of medicine – Y.B.)

In 1934, he received the ministerial assignment for educating interns at the surgical department of the hospital in Rotterdam, and he was appointed as an expert of the doctors’ committee at the faculty of surgery in Utrecht, by which he was once more attached to education.

Many of his articles were published in the Dutch Magazine of Surgery and foreign magazines. In 1925 and 1926 he was chairman of the Dutch Association of Surgery, since 1930, he is chairman of the Clinical Academy in Rotterdam. At the department Rotterdam of the Dutch Society to promoting surgery, he very much enjoys the trust of his fellow members, who appointed him to the chairman of the department council in 1933, in which function he also dedicated himself to social surgical questions.

31 – 01 – 1940

Prof. Dr. J. G. Remijnse says farewell

Tribute at the hospital at the Coolsingel

Yesterday, prof Dr. J.G. Remijnse, who’s been a surgeon of the hospital at the Coolsingel in Rotterdam since 1920 and who was recently appointed as professor at Utrecht, said farewell to his important profession in Rotterdam. In the doctors’ hall of the hospital, prof. Dr. J.G. Remijnse was honored by the hospital staff and the committee for the administration of municipal hospitals. Many were present for this occasion.

First, alderman (municipal councilor – Y.B.) Nivard, then Dr. S. Westra, the hospital chief, spoke. As a farewell, the hospital staff wanted to give Dr. Remijnse something, but they also wanted to keep something: that’s why the choice was made for a bronze plaque, created by artist Begeer, which shows the image of Dr. Remijnse with the years of his employment of the Rotterdam hospital. This plaque will be placed in the hospital near the surgical suites. A second casting was presented to Dr. Remijnse, to put in his home in Utrecht.

In conclusion, Dr. Westra wished the departing surgeon much happiness with the Royal award, which was presented to him by the alderman because it had pleased Her Majesty the Queen to bestow on prof. Dr. Remijnse the title of Officer in the Order of Orange-Nassau.

***

Note that the end of the above clipping shows that J. G. Remijnse was an Officer in the Order of Orange-Nassau. If you want to know more about this, check this link: Knight Orders.

Yvette also provided some death announcements from Dr. Remijnse’s family.

Clockwise top left:

Today passed way to our great sadness, after long and grievous suffering, our dear Mother, in-law and Grandmother

NEELTJE VEERHOEK

Widow of N. Remijnse at the age of over 78 years old.

Family Remijnse

Kapelle, July 19, 1947

The funeral was today, Tuesday.

===

Sole general announcement

Today our dear sister and sister-in-law, Mrs the widow

MARIA JOHANNA ADRIANA SILLEVIS- REMIJNSE

The Hague, September 22, 1956. Nieboerweg 21C.

On behalf of all:

Breukelen (where he lived)

Prof. Dr. J. G. Remijnse

No visitors.

===

Today, our dear mother, in-law, and grandmother, passed away in her sleep,

MARIA PIETERNELLA REMIJNSE-DE LINGY,

At the age of 83.

On behalf of all:

Dr. J.G. REMIJNSE

Rotterdam, March 7, 1938

No flowers.
No condolences.
The funeral is Thursday at 14:30 at the General Cemetary Crooswijk. (this means she was not Roman Catholic, or Jewish, they had their own cemetaries – Y.B.)

This is the sole announcement.

===

Sole and General announcement

Today passed away unexpectedly our fine Husband, Father, in-law, and Grandfather, Mister

  1. Remijnse

At the age of 69.

M.P. Remijnse-De Ligny (wife)

J.G. Remijnse (eldest son)

J.F. Remijnse – vd Made and children (Son, married to vd Made, and children)

J.P. Remijnse (son)

MJA Sillevis – Remijnse (daughter) (her anouncement is above)

A Sillevis (husband of MJA, above)

FW Remijnse (son, probably)

A Remijnse de Vrijs (son, married to De Vrijs)

Rotterdam December 11, 1923
Hoflaan 41 (adress)

No visitation.

The internment will occur at the General Cemetary Crooswijk (this means he was not Roman Catholic, or Jewish, they had their own cemetaries) on Saturday December 15 (a.s. is short voor aanstaande – meaning “this coming”  or “next” lit. the first Saturday that is to come from now.)

***

After his death the following was published in Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (Dutch Journal of Medicine May 8 1971. 115. Number 9), one of the world’s oldest journals.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In memoriam Prof. Dr. J.G. Remijnse –

On April 20th, 1971 Prof. Dr. Johan Gilles Remijnse passed away in Breukelen at the age of 93. He was former-professor at the RijksUniversity of Utrecht and as surgeon practiced the public praxis in Utrecht.

November 25, 1904 Remijnse was promoted and he became assistant to Prof. Narath and later chef de clinique at Prof. Lameris, who succeeded Prof. Narath.

Remijnse taught general medicine until 1920. In that year he was appointed city surgeon at the General Hospital at the Coolsingel in Rotterdam, where he succeeded Noordenbos, who had been called to Amsterdam. In this Rotterdam period Remijnse spent his happiest surgical years.

An important event voor Remijnse was receiving the doctorate in medicine honoris causa at the 300 centennial celebration of the Utrecht University.

After Remijnse said farewell to his surgical practice he was appointed Extraordinary Professor of social medicine in Utrecht. After several years, he withdrew permanently to spend more time on his hobbies.

Remijnse educated numerous surgeons. Besides operating techniques he taught students how, in his opinion, medicine would best be served. The character of his opinions was and always remained simplicity and honesty, for which he lead by example his students and coworkers in their duties as doctors.

When the milestone 90 was reached, a delegation of former-students gave him a certificate that made it clear once more how much Remijnse was appreciated by all of us. Later, a large number of his former-coworkers came to wish their ‘boss’ a happy birthday. They brought tangible evidence to show their affection for him and his wife. The ‘dernière vieillesse” had begun, but hope remained that our teacher would be around for some years to come.

The Archivum chirurgicum neerlandicum (1968, vol XX, Fasc. III) published an extensive “tribute.” In which an attempt was made to paint a portrait of the exceptional figure of Remijnse into our Homeland of surgery.

It was a huge blow for him that his wife passed away, whom he only survived by a few months. We will miss him.

Groningen, 24 April L.D. Eerland.

***

I am so glad that I stopped to follow this tangent and share my photo and Yvette’s information about Dr. Remijnse.

Someday I hope to research the uniform in the photo of the young J. G. Remijnse.

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Joy Neal Kidney has written a lovely review of my family history poetry and flash prose chapbook Kin types. Thank you so much, Joy. While you’re over there, check out Joy’s great blog if you haven’t already done so!

 

Kin Types by Luanne Castle

 

Kin Types can be purchased by using the photo as a link to get to Amazon.

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