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Archive for the ‘Dad and his family’ Category

Last week I told you about the great special to celebrate the 2nd anniversary of Val Erde’s blog, Colouring the Past.

I was so blessed to get one of her free colorizations!

She chose my paternal grandmother, Marie Klein, as a very young woman. This is the photo:

And this is the gorgeous colorization that Val created:

Now I feel like I could touch my grandmother’s hair and her blouse! Val did an amazing job, as she always does. I think her skin tones are very accurate, and that has got to be one of the most difficult things to get right.

This photo shows me that my grandmother’s love of pearls started young. She always wore pearls and collected a bit more pearl jewelry over the years. She gave my aunt a string of pearls for her wedding, and eventually my aunt gave them to me (she only had sons). You can check that out at this post, if you like: Vintage Jewelry.

Val will be able to answer any questions about the colorization process, if you leave a comment here for her. And I will respond as usual, although I don’t know anything about colorizing!

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I keep waiting for that day where I can get caught up on my genealogy research for a month straight. First I need to organize what I have. I pulled out the pedigree report book I had prepared almost five years ago by Uwe Porten, a German genealogist, of my grandmother’s Klein family that immigrated to the United States from Budesheim.

Today I find this an old-fashioned way of handling genealogy research, but it’s certainly beautiful and lends more “gravity” to the project.

You can see that this is called the Klein Family Research Project because Grandma’s maiden name was Klein. Her mother was Margarethe. Last week I shared her photo that Val repaired and colorized.

Margarethe Wendel Klein

The next photo gives you an idea of what the book contains.

and this:

Notice the records that the book contains. I also have these on CD. I think it’s amusing that two of the family surnames are Link and Wink. Because they rhyme!

All these Catholic records had to be obtained in person. That is why I had to hire Uwe to do this work. Unlike the Dutch records which are readily available online, the German records are much more difficult to locate.

The above page begins a summary of Uwe’s findings. Notice that he says he was first able to prove that Margarethe’s husband Frank came from Budesheim. He traced the Klein family “as well as several of the related ancestral families.” Margarethe’s grandfather Friedrich Wendel was located.

Frank Klein’s father actually came from Hergenfeld, which was about 10 miles west of Budesheim. Then he made his way to Budesheim. Notice it says that Hergenfeld was considered “abroad” because at that time, “Budesheim was part of the Grand-Duchy of Hesse-Darnstadt, and Hergenfeld was part of the Kingdom of Prussia. Does that make Frank’s father Johann Peter a Prussian? Grandma used to tell me a story about how she remembered her family saying “the Prussians are coming,” as though that was something bad. I find the whole Prussian thing VERY CONFUSING. And the more it is explained to me, the more confused I get. I don’t think it’s stupidity on my part. I think that I would need a PhD in Prussian studies to truly “get it.”

Share Your Research–Or Not?

Presenting some of the opening pages of the book here makes me think of a subject I’ve been pondering lately. On some of the Facebook genealogy groups people sometimes discuss how some family history researchers don’t want to share their work with others. And others do want to share. Nobody asked me, but I’ll give you my two cents on the matter.

I paid a small fortune for this research report from Uwe. In general, I’ve spent more money than I should on genealogy. And much much more time.

Do you think I am leading up to why would I share it then?

Why WOULDN’T I share it? Does sharing it make it cost me less in time or money? Does sharing it take away from my findings? It’s not like I’ve written the Great American novel and letting other people sign it.

The more information we share, the more information we reclaim. I like the notion of thousands of trees that all interconnect and our remembering of history grows in value.

Even more importantly, why wouldn’t I want to share CORRECT INFORMATION? All that shoddy info going around on Ancestry and other places is because of people who are too lazy or cheap/poor to do the work themselves. So why wouldn’t I want to help clean up the information by providing what is correct (or as correct as can be at this point)?

Bottom line: SHARE, SHARE, SHARE.

Now my photos are another story. Please do NOT share my photos without giving credit to me or my blog. Those are family heirlooms. UPDATE: I am adding this so there can be so mistaking my point about the photos. I have family photos because lots of family members have shared them with me. They belong to my family. Since starting this blog, in addition to all the amazing information I’ve gleaned and connections I’ve made, there have been some people who have:

  • Shared my photos online, such as in Facebook groups, without giving me or my family credit and severing the connection between photo and information behind it.
  • Shared my photos in Ancestry, posting them with the wrong identities!
  • Taken my photos and used them for their own commercial purposes, such as for their own books.

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I was finally able to ask Val Erde at Colouring the Past to colorize another photo from my collection.

I had a portrait of my paternal grandmother’s mother, Margarethe Wendel Klein, but it was in pretty bad shape.

I put it together like this for Val:

Using this photograph and researching from a “snapshot” I posted before.

Val was able to do a wonderful job with this damaged photo–both in sepia and in color.

RIP MARGARETHE WENDEL KLEIN

BIRTH 25 JUNE 1869  Budesheim, Mainz-Bingen, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

DEATH 24 MAY 1932  Elmhurst, Du Page, Illinois, United States

 

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This week I’m sharing photos of my father’s family in Illinois. This photograph was taken in July 1960 in Chicago.

 

From left to right: Aunt Anna, Aunt Marge, Aunt Dolly, Grandma, and Mom

Grandma and Aunt Anna were sisters–maiden name Klein. They grew up in Elmhurst, Illinois, which is in DuPage County. They were only a year apart in age and born in Budesheim, Germany, in 1892 and 1893.

Aunt Marge was Grandma’s daughter (Dad’s sister) and married to Guido (Joe) DiBasilio. Her sons Michael and Steven were already born by 1960 and James was born in April 1960. He was a new baby at the time of this photo.

Aunt Dolly was Uncle Frank’s (my dad’s twin) wife. She was born Doloria Pawlak. My cousin Leah was also born in 1960, February, so she was also a little baby when the photo was taken. David wasn’t born until 1962.

I was five years old at the time this pic was taken. My brother not born for three more years.

Look at the box of Kleenex table napkins on the table. The Corningware coffee pot. The dome clock behind them is in my living room today.

You see my mother’s beautiful very sheer dress? I remember it very well.

OK, in the lower right from our view? A baby bottle. So it could have belonged to Jim or Leah–or maybe even Steve who was only three?

***

I’ve shared the photo above before (it’s one of my favorites). My dad, his two siblings, and their mom. This was taken years before the photo of the women.

Do you see the picture behind Dad’s left shoulder?

This is it:

It’s a needlepoint that my father brought back from the Korean War. It hangs in my bedroom. The frame and mat are still in great shape because Grandma always liked to buy the best. So we know the photograph was taken after Dad got back from the war. Maybe he was already a college student at Western Michigan University, but the photograph was taken in my grandmother’s home in Chicago.

Have you seen similar Korean needlework before? I’d love to see other versions.

 

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My paternal Grandmother, Maria Anna Elisabetha Klein, was born 127 years ago today in Budesheim, Germany. 3 April 1892. She immigrated as a toddler with her family to Illinois and grew up in Elmhurst. Eventually she raised her own family in Chicago.

The next image is with her mother and her first child, Margaretha (Marge). This photo would be approximately 1925. The photo above would be sometime before that–perhaps before 1920.

The third photo is Grandma with Marge as well.

Notice how my grandmother’s foot seems swollen. I inherited the condition of primary lymphedema from her. Eventually her legs and feet swelled to much larger than this. She had to cut little Vs out of her shoe vamps. I wear compression stockings and have access to a pump that relieves some of the overflow fluid. She not only didn’t have the same treatments, but she didn’t even have the proper diagnosis.

Quite sometime ago I published a photo of my grandmother and her siblings as children. It is the only known photo of Grandma as a little girl. There are different opinions about which of the two shorter girls is Grandma.

Grandma moved to Kalamazoo during the 1960s and died there on 25 APRIL 1974.

Happy birthday, Grandma. RIP XO.

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My Uncle Frank is coming to visit for two weeks, so I am going to be unblogging, or is it nonblogging? 😉

My dad has been gone for four years come May, and this is my dad’s fraternal twin. He just turned 90. He’s flying in today from Arkansas.

The “twins” grew up in Elmhurst, Illinois, and later, Chicago. I think this photo, taken with their older sister Marge, is in Elmhurst.


I’ll be back when Uncle Frank’s visit is over. In the meantime, I hope your 2019 is off to a good start!

Comments are closed, but if you want to reach me, email me through the contact info on the blog or comment on a different post, please. Well, I wanted to close them, but the button is gone. I might not respond if you do comment. I’m sorry!

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Here is a great pic of my dad and his twin brother Frank that Val at Colouring the Past colorized for me. Dad is the one with lighter hair.

And Val colored it with blue coats and hats, too, because I wasn’t sure whether they would have been brown or blue, although felt sure they would have been one of those two colors. Which version do you prefer?

A Story of Chicago and My Uncle

I recently spent time with my uncle, and he told me a story about something that happened to him. Or rather, it didn’t happen to him.

In the sixties, Uncle Frank worked in Chicago at Fohrman Motors as a car salesman. Today, the dealership is gone and only the vacant lot is left. It’s in Chicago’s East Garfield Park neighborhood and is nearly 2/3 of the 2700 block of West Madison Street. This post takes a personal look at an event that changed the world for some Chicagoans.

On 7 January 1966, when he was 37 years old, my uncle was working at the dealership and had to use the restroom. He went there, only to find the facilities in use by a man making a racket with something or other. Uncle Frank couldn’t wait so he ran across the street to the body shop, but that bathroom was closed for maintenance. Used to being able to drive a car from the lot, my uncle grabbed the keys of a nearby vehicle and told one of his bosses that he had to run down the street to use the washroom.

Uncle Frank had several bosses, in a way, because Fohrman Motors was owned by Benjamin Fohrman and his four sons. An Illinois blogger, John Ruberry, says this about the company:

Forhman Motors was founded by Benjamin Fohrman, who was viewed as an innovative and pioneering car dealer. . . . . Older relatives of mine tell me that Forhman’s folksy television ads were common fare on local television.

The history of Benjamin Fohrman’s auto business is well-described in his obituary:

Mr. Fohrman, a native of Austria, founded Fohrman Motors near Michigan Avenue and 22d Street in 1912. He sold such cars as the Stoddard-Dayton, manufactured between 1905 and 1913, and the Rickenbacker, made in the early 1920s.

His strong influence on merchandising methods was felt in Chicago and elsewhere in the country. Before World War I, he was among the first to “import“ cars over dirt and often muddy roads from locations then considered far-off such as Lafayette, Ind.; Davenport, Ia.; and Kenosha.

He offered new cars on payment plans as early as 1914, and he was among the first to see that a secondhand car dealership could be successful. He bought used cars in small towns in the Midwest and sold them in Chicago.

At various times, he owned new-car dealerships that sold Chryslers and later Packards, and for many years Mr. Fohrman was a television advertiser.

Beginning in 1963, his agency at 2700 W. Madison St. sold used cars exclusively. Among its 80 employees were his four sons, Sidney, Edward, Sherwood and Cary.

My uncle worked for this family business, and he was pretty happy there. The neighborhood the dealership was in was primarily African-American. Uncle Frank tells me that that at least one of the Fohrmans went to bat in court often times for customers who lived in the area.

In other words, the family wouldn’t have minded that my uncle took off in a company-owned vehicle to use a bathroom down the street. And they seemed to have a decent relationship with the community.

When he got to his destination, a call came in for Uncle Frank. It was a woman employee at the dealership. All she said over and over was, “They’re all dead. They’re all dead.”

Imagine the shock he felt at her words. And then to discover that the man in the first bathroom had been making that noise by loading his gun! If my uncle hadn’t had to go so badly he would have waited for the bathroom instead of running across the street and then taking off in the car. He would have been the first person shot and killed. That day, Robert Jackson killed brothers Sid and Ed Fohrman and salesman Albert Sizer.

The Fohrmans were important in their community. In a 21 January 1966 article about their deaths in The National Jewish Post and Opinion, Sidney had been president of Niles Township Congregation, and Edward was vice president of the Park Synagogue.

I was ten-years-old when this occurred, but I don’t remember hearing about it. Quite probably my parents didn’t let me know. This is what happened as I can piece it together from accounts found online–and it all dovetails with my uncle’s account. What is different is how differently people perceived what had happened.

This is the account from the Chicago Crime Commission:

In this account there is no mention of possible motivation, and the murders serve as prelude for the Richard Speck case. He killed eight student nurses just a few months after the Fohrman massacre.

On the other hand, the article from Jet magazine blames the victims and builds sympathy for the murderer by calling him a “dying cancer patient.”

 

The difference between those two accounts points out for me the intensifying race relations.

Caught between these two views are the Jewish owners of Fohrman Motors, both Sid and Ed who had been killed and their father and other brothers (co-owners). The idea of businesses (sometimes Jewish-owned) preying upon the poor people of the inner city was starting to be noticed. The way people talked after this crime and the resulting focus on high interest brought out a lot of anti-Semitism.

Ebony took a more nuanced approach to the murders than Jet did. I am posting their photo of the dealership so you can see what it looked like, but please use it as a link to the Ebony article. In this piece by Alex Poinsett, credit is seen as a hidden “pitfall” to consumers.

The Fohrmans had the last word on this subject by addressing their truth about the issue of Jackson’s car in Benjamin’s obituary. This shows me how hurt they were by the blaming of the victims.

Rumors spread throughout Chicago that the man had been cheated on the car and had been paying an exorbitant 51 percent interest rate. Documents showed, however, that the interest rate was 15 1/2 percent, the price he paid was average and the problems with the car resulted from a major accident.

Even then, the car was insured through the agency, and the firm had agreed to pay most of the damages. Chicago`s American columnist Jack Mabley, noted for exposing shady auto dealers, wrote: “I`ve worked on most of the schlocky auto dealers in Chicago and never heard a whisper about Fohrman Motors.“

What a tragic story. I am so glad that my uncle really had to go to the bathroom. He’s almost 90 now, and we’re lucky to still have him. The Fohrman and Sizer families were not so lucky.

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BENJAMIN FOHRMAN OBITUARY:

 

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